Outsourcing Criminal Deportees

Outsourcing Criminal Deportees (2013, Eleanor Marie Lawrence Brown) Introduction [excerpt] Source-labor countries—states that “export” migrants—are virtually invisible in immigration law scholarship. Notwithstanding the growing recognition that ever more people live transnational lives, the dominant conceptualization of immigration law and policy in the United States remains uni-nationally oriented. Under this approach, most immigration questions hinge on reforming and enacting federal laws. “Crimmigration” scholarship—located at the intersection of criminal and immigration law—embodies this uni-national paradigm. Recent contributions by Professors Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar and David Read More

Procedural Due Process in the Expulsion of Aliens Under International, United States, and European Union Law: A Comparative Analysis

Procedural Due Process in the Expulsion of Aliens Under International, United States, and European Union Law: A Comparative Analysis (Won Kidane, 27 Emory Int’l L. Rev. 285 (2013) Liberal democracies aspire to respect minimum standards of individual liberty and due process to all. They structurally limit their powers with respect to how they treat all persons – including noncitizens, also known as “aliens.” Nonetheless, the exact scope and nature of the limitations imposed by international and domestic legal regimes for Read More

Immigration Enforcement in the United States: The Rise of a Formidable Machinery (Meissner et al. 2013) Meissner, Doris, Donald M. Kerwin, Muzaffar Chishti, and Claire Bergeron. 2013. Immigration Enforcement in the United States: The Rise of a Formidable Machinery. Migration Policy Institute. The U.S. government spends more on federal immigration enforcement than on all other principal federal criminal law enforcement agencies combined, and has allocated nearly $187 billion for immigration enforcement since 1986. In fiscal 2012, the federal government spent Read More