Removing Citizens: Parenthood, Immigration Courts, and Derivative Citizenship

Removing Citizens: Parenthood, Immigration Courts, and Derivative Citizenship (Kari Hong, Georgetown Immigration Law Journal (2015)). As a creature of administrative law, Congress has set forth clear, statutory definitions of “parent,” “child,” “son,” “daughter,” and “step-parent.” As a practical matter, these terms create a uniform system by which family relationships are recognized and immigration benefits are conferred. In one notable exception, Congress directs adjudicators to look to state law when determining which children are citizens at birth. Derivative citizenship, the legal process Read More

Citizenship Revocation, the Privilege to Have Rights and the Production of the Alien

Citizenship Revocation, the Privilege to Have Rights and the Production of the Alien (Audrey Macklin, 40:1 Queen’s LJ, 2014) Since 9/11, Western governments have redefined what it means to be a citizen. Though citizenship is often thought of as an inalienable right, the emergence of the “homegrown ” terrorist has called into question whether certain citizens deserve the protection that citizenship status provides. Although international treaties preclude a country from rendering a person stateless, recent legislative and executive action in the Read More