“We Deport Them but They Keep Coming Back”: The Normalcy of Deportation in the Daily Life of “Undocumented” Zimbabwean Migrant Workers in Botswana

“We Deport Them but They Keep Coming Back”: The Normalcy of Deportation in the Daily Life of “Undocumented” Zimbabwean Migrant Workers in Botswana (Treasa M. Galvin,  Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Volume 41, Number 4, 21 March 2015, pp. 617-634(18)) Based on ethnographic fieldwork among ‘undocumented’ Zimbabwean migrants in Botswana, this paper examines the complex strategies ‘undocumented’ migrants employ to deal with the threat and occurrence of deportation. In particular, the paper considers the manner in which strategies used to Read More

Deportation Stigma and Re-migration

Deportation Stigma and Re-migration (Liza Schuster & Nassim Majidi, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Volume 41, Number 4, 21 March 2015, pp. 635-652(18)) Many, if not most, of those who are forcibly expelled from the country to which they have migrated will not settle in the country to which they have been returned but will leave again. A recent article examined some of the reasons why this should be so. It was argued that in addition to the factors that Read More

Mexico’s Southern Border Plan: More Deportations and Widespread Human Rights Violations

Mexico’s Southern Border Plan: More Deportations and Widespread Human Rights Violations (Boggs 2015) Boggs, Clay. 2015. “Mexico’s Southern Border Plan: More Deportations and Widespread Human Rights Violations.” WOLA. https://www.wola.org/analysis/mexicos-southern-border-plan-more-deportations-and-widespread-human-rights-violations/. Mexico’s Southern Border Plan (Programa Frontera Sur) was announced on July 7, 2014. Its stated objective is to bring order to migration in Mexico’s southern region while protecting the human rights of migrants who enter and travel through the country. The plan has coincided with a sharp increase in deportations from Mexico: according Read More

Deporting Social Capital: Implications for immigrant communities in the United States

Deporting Social Capital: Implications for immigrant communities in the United States (Jacqueline Hagan, David Leal & Nestor Rodriguez, Migr Stud (2015) 3 (3): 370-392) The United States currently removes approximately 400,000 individual migrants each year, which represents close to an eightfold increase since the mid-1990s. While scholars have studied the consequences of such policies for children and families, this article posits broader effects on communities through the reduction of immigrant social and human capital. Using findings from three studies of immigrant communities and Read More

The case against removal: Jus noci and harm in deportation practice

The case against removal: Jus noci and harm in deportation practice (Barbara Buckinx & Alexandra Filindra, Migr Stud (2015) 3 (3): 393-416) The United States removes from its territory almost 400,000 noncitizens annually—Germany removes about 50,000 people each year, France 26,000, and Canada 12,000. In this article, we focus on the impact of removal, and we argue that many individuals—often those who are best integrated in their countries of long-term residence—will suffer significant physical, psychological, economic, and social harm upon their return. Read More