Beyond Respectability: Dismantling the Harms of “Illegality”

Beyond Respectability:  Dismantling the Harms of “Illegality” (Angelica Chazaro, 52 Harv. J. on Legis. 355, 2015) Current pro-immigrant reform efforts focus on legalization. Proposals seek to place as many of the eleven million undocumented people in the United States as possible on a “path to earned citizenship.” However, these reform efforts suffer from a significant and underappreciated blind spot: the strategies used to advocate legalization harm those to whom the path to citizenship is barred — such as those with prior Read More

Airport Casualties: Non-Admission and Return Risks at Times of Internalized/Externalized Border Controls

Airport Casualties: Non-Admission and Return Risks at Times of Internalized/Externalized Border Controls (2015, Maybritt Jill Alpes) This article analyzes what can happen to forced returnees upon arrival in their country of nationality. Subjective configurations of state agents in the Global South have created return risks, which in turn transform subjectivities of post-colonial citizens. The article contributes to this Special Issue by tracing repercussions of the externalization and internalization of border controls. In the case of Cameroon, these connections have resulted in Read More

Cutting Genuine Links: A Normative Analysis of Citizenship Deprivation

Cutting Genuine Links: A Normative Analysis of Citizenship Deprivation (Rainer Baubock & Vesco Paskalev, 30 Geo. Immigr. L.J. 47, 2015) Most critical analyses assess citizenship deprivation policies against international human rights and domestic rule of law standards, such as prevention of statelessness, non-arbitrariness with regard to justifications and judicial remedies, or non-discrimination between different categories of citizens. This paper considers citizenship deprivation policies instead from a political theory perspective—how deprivation policies reflect specific conceptions of political community. We distinguish four normative Read More

Migrants Deported from the United States and Mexico to the Northern Triangle: A Statistical and Socioeconomic Profile

Migrants Deported from the United States and Mexico to the Northern Triangle: A Statistical and Socioeconomic Profile (2015, Rodrigo Dominguez Villegas & Victoria Rietig) The United States and Mexico have apprehended nearly 1 million Salvadoran, Guatemalan, and Honduran migrants since 2010, deporting more than 800,000 of them, including more than 40,000 children. While the United States led in pace and number of apprehensions of Central Americans in 2010-2014, Mexico pulled ahead in 2015. Amid increasingly muscular enforcement by Mexico, U.S. Read More