Deportation, Anxiety, Justice: New Ethnographic Perspectives

Deportation, Anxiety, Justice: New Ethnographic Perspectives (Heike Drotbohm & Ines Hasselberg, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Volume 41, 2015 – Issue 4) This paper introduces a collection of articles that share ethnographic perspectives on the intersections between deportation, anxiety and justice. As a form of expulsion regulating human mobility, deportation policies may be justified by public authorities as measures responding to anxieties over (unregulated) migration. At the same time, they also bring out uncertainty and unrest to deportable/deported migrants Read More

The Reversal of Migratory Family Lives: A Cape Verdean Perspective on Gender and Sociality pre- and post-deportation

The Reversal of Migratory Family Lives: A Cape Verdean Perspective on Gender and Sociality Pre- and Post-deportation (Heike Drotbohm, 2014) Deportation, as a coerced and involuntary mode of return migration, contradicts common assumptions and understandings of transnational livelihoods. This can be felt particularly strongly in the realm of the family—the social sphere where migration is facilitated and enacted. Drawing on anthropological fieldwork in Cape Verdean transnational social fields, this paper applies a gendered perspective in examining how deportation affects individual Read More

On the Durability and the Decomposition of Citizenship: The Social Logics of Forced Return Migration in Cape Verde

On the Durability and the Decomposition of Citizenship: The Social Logics of Forced Return Migration in Cape Verde (2011, Heike Drotbohm, Citizenship Studies 15 (2011): 381-96) This article explores the impact of deportation, a state practice increasingly applied by European and North American governments, on notions of sociality in transnational social fields. In particular, it concentrates on the dynamics between formal citizenship on the one hand and the moral economies of belonging and membership on the other. Drawing on anthropological Read More