The EU-Turkey deal: what happens to people who return to Turkey?

The EU-Turkey deal: what happens to people who return to Turkey? (Sevda Tunaboylu and Jill Alpes, Forced Migration Review, 2017)   On 18th March 2016, Turkey and the European Union (EU) made a joint statement. Political leaders agreed to the return to Turkey of people who had crossed to the Greek islands through irregular channels and also agreed to prevent the arrival of new asylum seekers via sea or land – in exchange for the liberalisation of EU visa requirements Read More

Post-Deportation Risks and Monitoring Mini-Feature

Post-Deportation Risks and Monitoring Mini-Feature (Forced Migration Review, vol. 54, February 2017) People whose application for asylum has been refused are often deported, usually to their country of origin. Little is known, however, about what happens to them on that return journey, on arrival in the country to which they are deported, and during the weeks and months that follow. The articles in this mini-feature examine four cases: failed asylum seekers deported to the Democratic Republic of Congo, Sri Lanka and Read More

Post-Deportation Risks: Criminalized Departure and Risks for Returnees in Countries of Origin

Post-Deportation Risks: Criminalized Departure and Risks for Returnees in Countries of Origin (2015, Charlotte Blondel, Marie Conciatori, Nausicaa Preiss, Meritxell Sayos Monras, Suzanne Seiller, Janine Uhlmannsiek ) Following the recent crisis in the Mediterranean Sea, the European Commission presented on May 15th 2015 a new European Agenda centred on the present challenges of global migration. As the High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy and Vice-President of the Commission stated, “with this agenda we confirm and Read More

Unsafe Return II

Unsafe Return II (2013, Catherine Ramos) This report has been prepared in order to continue to inform the Home Office, FCO and government departments such as the Country of Origin Information Service of new information relating to the post return experience of Congolese returnees to DRC. Since 2010 Home Office departments have been provided with evidence in order to inform policy, as recommended by the Independent Asylum Commission. This included the report Unsafe Return – Refoulement of Congolese asylum seekers’ Read More

Avoiding Refoulement: The Need to Monitor Deported Refused Asylum Seekers

Avoiding Refoulement: The Need to Monitor Deported Refused Asylum Seekers (2012, Leana Podeszfa & Charlotte Manicom) Although the fate of deported asylum seekers remains largely undocumented, a number of organisations have compiled evidence that the human rights of refused asylum seekers are being violated upon return. Deportees are often arrested, put in prison, and tortured. Some are charged with treason; some disappear altogether. Using the example of the United Kingdom, this article argues that such deportations amount to refoulement, and Read More

Unsafe Return: Refoulement of Congolese Asylum Seekers

Unsafe Return: Refoulement of Congolese Asylum Seekers (2011, Catherine Ramos) On 26th February 2007 a Congolese client of Justice First was forcibly removed from the UK on a charter flight to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), where he arrived on 27th February with his wife and children. After interrogation, the family was allowed to leave the airport. In the early hours of 28th February the client was arrested at the address his wife had given to the authorities Read More