Afghanistan: sent back to a war zone

Afghanistan: sent back to a war zone (Petersmann 2017) Petersmann, Sandra. 2017. “Afghanistan: Sent back to a War Zone.” DW News, May 31. http://www.dw.com/en/afghanistan-sent-back-to-a-war-zone/a-39055955. Sandra Petersmann of DW News interviews Afghan deportees from Germany.  In the first two months of 2017, Germany denied more than half of all asylum applications.  Many of these deportees struggle in reintegrating into their countries of origin and continue to seek a route to return to Germany, where they have established strong ties.

Report: Rate of deportations stagnating in Germany

Report: Rate of deportations stagnating in Germany (DW News, 2017) DW News. 2017. “Report: Rate of Deportations Stagnating in Germany,” June 4. http://www.dw.com/en/report-rate-of-deportations-stagnating-in-germany/a-39110422. Die Welt am Sonntag newspaper reported that, by the end of April, a total of 8,620 people had been sent back to their countries of origin after their asylum applications were rejected [in Germany]. The figures indicated a marked stagnation compared to last year, which saw a total of 25,375 deportations. This year has also seen fewer rejected Read More

Migration Italy and Germany Step Up Measures to Deter Asylum Seekers

 Migration Italy and Germany Step Up Measures to Deter Asylum Seekers (IRIN News, Jan. 13, 2017) Those who thought Europe’s refugee “crisis” was over were reminded this week that tens of thousands of refugees remain stranded in Greece and the Balkans. Images of refugee tents shrouded in snow on the Greek islands have sparked outrage about the lack of adequate shelter, and scorn has been poured on the Greek government for keeping refugees in such miserable conditions. But others have Read More

Post-Deportation Risks: People Face Insecurity and Threats After Forced Returns

Post-Deportation Risks: People Face Insecurity and Threats After Forced Returns (Maybritt Jill Alpes & Ninna Nyberg Sørensen, Danish Institute for Policy Studies Policy Brief, November 2016) This brief takes a look at the risks migrants and rejected asylum seekers face when they’re forcibly returned to their point of origin. The text’s authors specifically argue that forced returns have become unduly criminalized and expose returnees to economic deprivation and psychosocial harm, often at the hands of predatory state agents.

Migrant Detention in the European Union: A Thriving Business

Migrant Detention in the European Union: A Thriving Business; Outsourcing and privatisation of migrant detention. (MIGREUROP, 2016). What does a migrant cost per day? That question is spotlighted if migration policy is determined by cost-benefit calculations, rather than by the principle of humane treatment. Such a political approach is taken in many fields of public services, from education and transport to electricity and water. To offer every service at the lowest possible cost, the concept of privatization is always adopted Read More

The case against removal: Jus noci and harm in deportation practice

The case against removal: Jus noci and harm in deportation practice (Barbara Buckinx & Alexandra Filindra, Migr Stud (2015) 3 (3): 393-416) The United States removes from its territory almost 400,000 noncitizens annually—Germany removes about 50,000 people each year, France 26,000, and Canada 12,000. In this article, we focus on the impact of removal, and we argue that many individuals—often those who are best integrated in their countries of long-term residence—will suffer significant physical, psychological, economic, and social harm upon their return. Read More

Deciphering Deportation Practices Across the Global North

Deciphering Deportation Practices Across the Global North (Weber 2014) Weber, Leanne. 2014. “Deciphering Deportation Practices Across the Global North.” In The Routledge Handbook on Crime and Migration, edited by S. Pickering and J. Ham, 1sted., 155–78. Abingdon Oxon, UK: Routledge. doi:10.4324/9780203385562.ch10. The increasing use of deportation appears to be a universal phenomenon across the Global North, driven by uncertainties arising from globalization and the ubiquity of ‘the governmentality of unease’ (Bigo 2002). However, against this broad backdrop of apparent uniformity, Read More

The Legal-Domestic Sources of Immigrant Rights:  The United States, Germany, and the European Union

The Legal-Domestic Sources of Immigrant Rights:  The United States, Germany, and the European Union (Joppke 2001) Joppke, Christian. 2001. “The Legal-Domestic Sources of Immigrant Rights.” Comparative Political Studies 34 (4): 339–66. doi:10.1177/0010414001034004001. This article traces the evolution of two types of immigrant rights—alien rights and the right to citizenship—across three polities (the United States, Germany, and the European Union). It argues that the sources of rights expansion are mostly legal and domestic: Rights expansion originates in independent and activist courts, which Read More