Understanding Secondary Immigration Enforcement: Immigrant Youth and Family Separation in a Border County

Understanding Secondary Immigration Enforcement: Immigrant Youth and Family Separation in a Border County (Nina Rabin, Journal of Law and Education, 47 (1), 2018). In debates over immigration reform, young people in immigrant families are often characterized as a distinct population, with claims and interests entirely separate from those of their parents. Bifurcating the undocumented population between children and parents over-simplifies how immigration enforcement impacts families. This article challenges the dichotomy between children and parents by studying how young people, regardless of Read More

Crossing Borders and Criminalizing Identity: The Disintegrated Subjects of Administrative Sanctions

Crossing Borders and Criminalizing Identity: The Disintegrated Subjects of Administrative Sanctions. (Keramet Reiter and Susan Bibler Coutin, Law and Society Review, 51 (567). 2017) This paper draws on in-depth, qualitative interviews that examine individual experiences in two different legal contexts: deportation regimes and supermax prisons. Through putting these contexts and experiences into dialogue, we identify common legal processes of punishment experiences across both contexts. Specifically, the U.S. legal system re-labels immigrants (as deportable noncitizens) and supermax prisoners (as dangerous gang offenders). This Read More

Foreign Farmworkers in Canada Fear Deportation If They Complain

Foreign Farmworkers in Canada Fear Deportation If They Complain  (Levin 2017) Levin, Dan. 2017. “Foreign Farmworkers in Canada Fear Deportation If They Complain.” The New York Times, August 13. Migrant farmworkers in Canada are often exploited and do not report complaints out of fear of being deported.  Canada’s seasonal agriculture worker program was set up to recruit migrants from Mexico and 11 Caribbean nations to work for up to eight months a year to address chronic labor shortages, but critics Read More

A Surge of Migrants Crossing Into Quebec Tests Canada’s Welcome

A Surge of Migrants Crossing Into Quebec Tests Canada’s Welcome (Levin 2017) Levin, Dan. 2017. “A Surge of Migrants Crossing Into Quebec Tests Canada’s Welcome.” The New York Times, August 10. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/10/world/americas/a-surge-of-migrants-crossing-into-quebec-tests-canadas-welcome.html. Despite the Canadian government’s lifting of a temporary protection policy for Haiti in 2014 leading to resuming deportations this past March, Haitians are continuing to flood over the U.S.’ northern border into Canada.  Around 1,500 asylum-seekers crossed the border into Quebec in July and according to the Canada Read More

New immigration law in Argentina bans entry, expels foreigners with criminal records

New immigration law in Argentina bans entry, expels foreigners with criminal records (Fox News 2017) Fox News. 2017. “New Immigration Law in Argentina Bans Entry, Expels Foreigners with Criminal Records,” January 31. http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/01/31/new-immigration-law-in-argentina-bans-entry-expels-foreigners-with-criminal-record.html. Argentinian President Mauricio Macri signed a degree that toughens immigration law to speed up the deportation process and bar entry to foreigners with criminal records.  The decree greenlights the prompt deportation of thousands of foreign inmates currently serving sentences in Argentina and has received some backlash from Read More

Regulating the Human Supply Chain

Regulating the Human Supply Chain (Gordan 2017) Gordon, Jennifer. 2017. “Regulating the Human Supply Chain.” Iowa Law Review 102 (2): 445+. https://ilr.law.uiowa.edu/print/volume-102-issue-2/regulating-the-human-supply-chain/. Legal scholarship has failed to take note of the increasing impact of recruitment intermediaries on the rule of law in the United States, and on the regulation of employment in U.S. low-wage labor markets in particular.  This Article fills that gap for forming a novel conceptual framing of migrant recruitment as a “human supply chain.”  It builds on this Read More

Deported with No Possessions

Deported with No Possessions: The Mishandling of Migrants’ Personal Belongings by CBP and ICE (Walter Ewing and Guillermo Cantor, American Immigration Council, 2016) U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) have a serious and longstanding problem with handling the personal belongings of detained migrants in their custody. Too often, some or all of a detainee’s belongings are lost, destroyed, or stolen by the immigration-enforcement agents entrusted with their care. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Read More

Migration and Belonging: Narratives from a Highland Town

Migration and Belonging: Narratives from a Highland Town (collection of blog posts, introduction by Lauren Heidbrink, 2016) Youth Circulations is honored to showcase the important contributions of Guatemalan scholars in a new multilingual series entitled “Migration and Belonging: Narratives from a Highland Town.” This 7-part series emerges from a longitudinal study on the deportation and social reintegration of youth in Guatemala and Southern Mexico. With generous funding from the National Science Foundation, an interdisciplinary team conducted ethnographic and survey research Read More

Feeling like a citizen, living as a denizen: Deportees’ sense of belonging

Feeling like a citizen, living as a denizen: Deportees’ sense of belonging (Tanya Golash-Boza, American Behavioral Scientist, 60(13), 2016) The implementation of restrictive immigration laws in 1997 in the United States has led to the deportation of hundreds of thousands of legal permanent residents—denizens who had made the United States their home. Mass deportations of denizens have given renewed importance to territorial belonging and legal citizenship for theories of citizenship, a relatively neglected area of scholarship in this field. This Read More

Programa Frontera Sur: The Mexican Government’s Faulty Immigration Policy

Programa Frontera Sur: The Mexican Government’s Faulty Immigration Policy (Castillo 2016) Castillo, Alejandra. 2016. “Programa Frontera Sur: The Mexican Government’s Faulty Immigration Policy.” U.S. public and media attention on the issue of immigration has remained almost completely focused on the northern Mexican border and fine points of U.S. immigration policy. In contrast, Mexico’s “other” border—the southern border—has fallen in the shadow of media coverage even as it has become the primary transit route for Central American migrants fleeing escalating violence Read More

Home Sweet Home? Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador’s Role in a Deepening Refugee Crisis

Home Sweet Home? Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador’s Role in a Deepening Refugee Crisis (2016, Amnesty International) As violence has worsened and poverty and inequality remain prevalent, the Central American governments of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador, also known as the Northern Triangle, are doubly failing to protect their citizens: socioeconomic conditions remain poor and an increasingly violent environment permeates every corner of their countries, which causes people to flee in record numbers, but governments are failing to provide protection Read More

Tackling the Global Refugee Crisis: From Shirking to Sharing Responsibility

Tackling the Global Refugee Crisis: From Shirking to Sharing Responsibility (Amnesty International, Oct. 2016) On 19 September 2016 the United Nations (UN) General Assembly collectively, and spectacularly, failed the 21 million refugees of this world. The “High-level Summit to address large movements of refugees and migrants” was to address the global refugee crisis, a crisis in which, daily, millions fleeing war and persecution in countries like Syria, South Sudan, Myanmar and Iraq suffer intolerable misery and human rights violations. World Read More

Estadísticas Migratorias, Síntesis 2016

Estadísticas Migratorias, Síntesis 2016 (Secretaría de Gobernación – Estados Unidos de México) La creciente movilidad de personas a nivel mundial demanda la conformación de estadísticas sistematizadas, den cuenta de los distintos ujos de personas que arriban a México y parten de él por diversos motivos y en diferentes condiciones migratorias, así como de los que deciden establecerse en el país. Con base en los registros administrativos generados en los diversos puntos de internación, ocinas y estaciones migratorias de las delegaciones Read More

Rebuilding Self and Country: Deportee Reintegration in Jamaica

Rebuilding Self and Country: Deportee Reintegration in Jamaica (Bernard Headley and Dragan Milovanovic, 2016, Migration Policy Institute) More than 45,000 Jamaicans were deported from abroad between 2000 and 2014, primarily from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada. Each month these countries return more than 100 Jamaicans on average to a nation grappling with persistently high levels of crime and poverty. Deportees are not greeted with open arms upon return, in part due to a widely held view in Read More

Is There Any Blood on My Hands? Deportation as a Crime of International Law

Is There Any Blood on My Hands? Deportation as a Crime of International Law (Chetail 2016) Chetail, Vincent. 2016. “Is There Any Blood on My Hands? Deportation as a Crime of International Law.” Leiden Journal of International Law 29 (3): 917–43. doi:10.1017/S0922156516000376. The present article revisits international criminal law as a tool for sanctioning the most patent abuses against migrants. Although deportation is traditionally considered as an attribute of the state inherent to its territorial sovereignty, this prerogative may degenerate Read More

Traumatic Events and Symptoms Among Mexican Deportees in a Border Community

Traumatic Events and Symptoms Among Mexican Deportees in a Border Community (Juan M. Peña, et. al, 2016, Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2017) Research on traumatic events experienced among Mexicans deported from the United States is scant. Using clinical interviews, this study assessed the frequency of traumatic events and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among 47 Mexican deportees in a U.S.-Mexico border community. The majority of participants (98%) reported having experienced one or more Read More

Migración en Tránsito por México: Rostro de una Crisis Humanitaria Internacional

Migración en Tránsito por México: Rostro de una Crisis Humanitaria Internacional (2016, Red de Documentación de Organizaciones Defensoras de Migrantes (REDODEM)) El fenómeno de la movilidad humana sigue siendo uno de los rasgos distintivos de las dinámicas globales. Si bien esto es parte de una dinámica prácticamente generalizada en el mundo, aquí nos referimos a aquellas migraciones que son fruto de la prevalencia de la desigualdad en diferentes regiones del planeta. Aquellas que por acción u omisión de los Estados Read More

Detained, Deceived, and Deported: Experiences of Recently Deported Central American Families

Detained, Deceived, and Deported: Experiences of Recently Deported Central American Families (Guillermo Cantor and Tory Johnson, American Immigration Council, 2016) Over the last few years, the escalation of violence in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala (collectively known as the Northern Triangle of Central America) has reached dramatic levels. thousands of women and their children have fled and arrived in the United states with the hope of finding protection. But for many of them, their attempts to escape merely resulted in Read More

El Contexto Regional del Desplazamiento y la Migración Forzada en Centroamérica, México y Estados Unidos

El Contexto Regional del Desplazamiento y la Migración Forzada en Centroamérica, México y Estados Unidos (2016, Consejeria en Proyectos para Refugiados Latinoamericanos / Project Counselling Service-PCS) La movilidad humana en los países de Centroamérica y México en su tránsito hacia los Estados Unidos engloba una serie de problemáticas y desafíos para la garantía de los derechos humanos que deben ser entendidos en clave regional y transnacional. El constante e incesante flujo migratorio mixto es una expresión de la crisis humanitaria Read More

Desert, detention, and deportation: Mexican women’s descriptions of migration stressors and sources of strength

Desert, detention, and deportation: Mexican women’s descriptions of migration stressors and sources of strength (Ruth Ann Belknap, Health Care for Women International, 37 (9), 2016) I analyzed interviews ( n = 10) of women recently deported from the United States of America to Mexico, exploring what women experienced immediately after deportation. The women who were residing in a short-term shelter in Nogales, Mexico, described their greatest stressors and sources of strength. Women identified the border crossing experience, apprehension, detention, and family Read More

Human Rights and the International Law Commission’s Draft Articles on the Expulsion of Aliens

Human Rights and the International Law Commission’s Draft Articles on the Expulsion of Aliens (Gerald L. Neuman, 2016) The completion of the project of the International Law Commission (ILC) on “the expulsion of aliens” marked an important stage in the development of international law relating to migration. The resulting Draft Articles on the Expulsion of Aliens reflect the joint effort of the ILC’s distinguished experts on public international law, from all regions of the world, to enunciate principles that regulate Read More

Deportation as a Global Phenomenon: Reflections on the Draft Articles on the Expulsion of Aliens

Deportation as a Global Phenomenon: Reflections on the Draft Articles on the Expulsion of Aliens (2016, Daniel Kanstroom) Critical appraisal of the International Law Commission’s Draft Articles on the Expulsion of Aliens (“Draft Articles”) demands a conceptualization of contemporary expulsion or deportation as a global phenomenon. Deportation may be functionally defined as a powerful government assertion of high stakes sanctions in low formality settings aimed at the most powerless and marginalized members of society. In the United States context, deportation Read More

Mexico’s Recent Immigration Enforcement Efforts

Mexico’s Recent Immigration Enforcement Efforts (CRS 2016) “Mexico’s Recent Immigration Enforcement Efforts”. 2016. CRS Report US Assistance Mexico Southern Border Plan March 2016. Congressional Research Service. https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/2842650-CRS-Report-US-Assistance-Mexico-Southern-Border.html This report focuses on the execution of Mexico’s Southern Border Plan.  While US President Barack Obama and some members of Congress support this effort, human rights and humanitarian agencies have been critical.  Mexico received around $20 million in US assistance to support its Southern Border.

Rights and Reintegrating Deported Migrants for National Development: The Jamaican Model

Rights and Reintegrating Deported Migrants for National Development: The Jamaican Model (Bernard Headley & Dragan Milovanovic, Social Justice, 43.1, 2016). Each year, the US, the UK, and Canada together deport hundreds of thousands of people. Under President Barack Obama, US deportations were on track to hit a record two million by the end of 2014-nearly the same number of persons deported between 1892 and 1997 (New York Times 2013). In 2013, 50,741 persons were deported from the UK, or they Read More

Reducing the Deportation’s Harm by Expanding Constitutional Protections to Functional Americans

Reducing the Deportation’s Harm by Expanding Constitutional Protections to Functional Americans (Beth Caldwell, 37 Whittier L. Rev. 355, 2016) This paper draws upon primary research conducted with deportees in Mexico to highlight the need to extend constitutional protections to deportation proceedings. Deportation is particularly cruel for those who have become integrated into American society. People are permanently separated from their spouses and children, and from the only country that they have ever considered to be their home. This experience often triggers Read More

“Where are we going to live?”: Migration and Statelessness in Haiti and the Dominican Republic

“Where are we going to live?”: Migration and Statelessness in Haiti and the Dominican Republic (Amnesty International 2016) Amnesty International. “‘Where Are We Going to Live?’: Migration and Statelessness in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.” 2016. https://www.amnestyusa.org/files/amr3641052016_where_am_i_going_to_live.compressed.pdf. In December 2013, the Dominican Republic set out an 18-month National Regularization Plan for Foreigners with Irregular Migration Status aimed at foreigners who had migrated to the Dominican Republic. In the same month, the government announced a suspension of all deportations, but promised Read More

Report on the Situation of Human Rights in the Dominican Republic

Report on the Situation of Human Rights in the Dominican Republic (IACHR 2015) Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. “Report on the Situation of Human Rights in the Dominican Republic.” 2015. http://www.oas.org/en/iachr/reports/pdfs/DominicanRepublic-2015.pdf. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights is presenting this report to examine the situation with regard to the rights to nationality, legal personality, equality and nondiscrimination, as well as other related human rights from the situation created by judgment TC/0168/13 of the Dominican Republic’s Constitutional Court on September 23, 2013. Read More

Authorized and Unauthorized Immigrant Parents: The Impact of Legal Vulnerability on Family Contexts

Authorized and Unauthorized Immigrant Parents: The Impact of Legal Vulnerability on Family Contexts (Kalina Brabeck, Erin Sibley, & M. Brinton Lykes, Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Science, 2016). This study explores the social-ecological contexts of unauthorized immigrant families and their U.S.-born children, through examining how otherwise similarly low-income, urban, Latino immigrant families differ on the basis of the parents’ legal status and interactions with the immigration system. Drawing on social-ecological theory, variations based on parents’ legal vulnerability among exosystem-level experiences (e.g., Read More

Stopping the Revolving Door: Reception and Reintegration Services for Central American Deportees

Stopping the Revolving Door: Reception and Reintegration Services for Central American Deportees (Victoria Rietig & Rodrigo Dominguez Villegas, Migration Policy Institute, 2016) In the past five years, hundreds of thousands of Central American migrants deported from Mexico and the United States—including tens of thousands of children—have arrived back in the Northern Triangle countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. For many deportees, the conditions upon arrival are worse than those that compelled them to leave in the first place. They and their Read More

“Without Papers, I Am No One”: Stateless People in the Dominican Republic

“Without Papers, I Am No One”: Stateless People in the Dominican Republic (Amnesty International, 2015.) A 2013 Constitutional Court judgment (Judgment 168-13) has made statelessness a matter of law for several generations of Dominicans of foreign descent. This report shows that several groups of people, mostly of Haitian descent, living in the country remain stateless. People who are stateless in the Dominican Republic and lack identity documents are denied a range of human rights and prevented from participating fully in Read More

Deportación y Salud Mental en Migrantes Centroamericanos

Deportación y Salud Mental en Migrantes Centroamericanos (2015, Ietza Bojorquez) La deportación de migrantes centroamericanos en Estados Unidos afecta la salud mental tanto de quienes son repatriados, como de sus familias y comunidades. Aquéllos que son devueltos tras haber vivido largo tiempo en Estados Unidos dejan atrás familiares y amigos, y deben readaptarse a una sociedad con la que han perdido contacto. Los que son detenidos poco tiempo después de cruzar la frontera, en cambio, pueden experimentar sensación de fracaso Read More

Migrants Deported from the United States and Mexico to the Northern Triangle: A Statistical and Socioeconomic Profile

Migrants Deported from the United States and Mexico to the Northern Triangle: A Statistical and Socioeconomic Profile (2015, Rodrigo Dominguez Villegas & Victoria Rietig) The United States and Mexico have apprehended nearly 1 million Salvadoran, Guatemalan, and Honduran migrants since 2010, deporting more than 800,000 of them, including more than 40,000 children. While the United States led in pace and number of apprehensions of Central Americans in 2010-2014, Mexico pulled ahead in 2015. Amid increasingly muscular enforcement by Mexico, U.S. Read More

The Realities of Returning Home: Youth Repatriation in Guatemala

The Realities of Returning Home: Youth Repatriation in Guatemala (2015, Alejandra Argueta, Nathan Hesse, Michael Johnson, and Warren Newton) In the summer of 2014, record numbers of migrants from Central American countries, many of them unaccompanied minors, were intercepted at the U.S.-Mexico border. In the United States, much of the debate in the media and in Congress focused on how to process and return these migrants to their countries of origin—but what happens to these migrants after they are returned? This Read More

Post-Deportation Risks: Criminalized Departure and Risks for Returnees in Countries of Origin

Post-Deportation Risks: Criminalized Departure and Risks for Returnees in Countries of Origin (2015, Charlotte Blondel, Marie Conciatori, Nausicaa Preiss, Meritxell Sayos Monras, Suzanne Seiller, Janine Uhlmannsiek ) Following the recent crisis in the Mediterranean Sea, the European Commission presented on May 15th 2015 a new European Agenda centred on the present challenges of global migration. As the High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy and Vice-President of the Commission stated, “with this agenda we confirm and Read More

Deportations as Theaters of Inequality

Deportations as Theaters of Inequality (Amy Reed-Sandoval, Public Affairs Quarterly, Vol. 29, No. 2, April 2015) In this paper, I argue that deportations often serve as “theaters of inequality” that reinforce the unjust, widely held perception that Latina/os and Latin Americans do not belong in the united States and can therefore be treated as inferiors. My analysis focuses on the United States but is intended to be applicable to other states and contexts. Working within a relational egalitarian framework, I Read More

Mexico’s Southern Border Plan: More Deportations and Widespread Human Rights Violations

Mexico’s Southern Border Plan: More Deportations and Widespread Human Rights Violations (Boggs 2015) Boggs, Clay. 2015. “Mexico’s Southern Border Plan: More Deportations and Widespread Human Rights Violations.” WOLA. https://www.wola.org/analysis/mexicos-southern-border-plan-more-deportations-and-widespread-human-rights-violations/. Mexico’s Southern Border Plan (Programa Frontera Sur) was announced on July 7, 2014. Its stated objective is to bring order to migration in Mexico’s southern region while protecting the human rights of migrants who enter and travel through the country. The plan has coincided with a sharp increase in deportations from Mexico: according Read More

Deporting Social Capital: Implications for immigrant communities in the United States

Deporting Social Capital: Implications for immigrant communities in the United States (Jacqueline Hagan, David Leal & Nestor Rodriguez, Migr Stud (2015) 3 (3): 370-392) The United States currently removes approximately 400,000 individual migrants each year, which represents close to an eightfold increase since the mid-1990s. While scholars have studied the consequences of such policies for children and families, this article posits broader effects on communities through the reduction of immigrant social and human capital. Using findings from three studies of immigrant communities and Read More

The Forgotten Deported: A Declaration on the Rights of Expelled and Deported Persons

The Forgotten Deported: A Declaration on the Rights of Expelled and Deported Persons (2015, Daniel Kanstroom & Jessica Chicco) This article considers a “Declaration on the Rights of Expelled and Deported Persons.” Drafted by the authors with significant input from a wide array of scholars, activists, judges, and others, this Declaration, reprinted in Appendix A, responds to what has become in recent years a major worldwide phenomenon: the deportation (also known as removal or expulsion) of large numbers of noncitizens. Read More

Mexican migrants and the rise of the deportation regime, 1942-2014

Mexican migrants and the rise of the deportation regime, 1942-2014 (Goodman 2015) Goodman, Adam. 2015. “Mexican Migrants and the Rise of the Deportation Regime, 1942-2014.” University of Pennsylvania. http://repository.upenn.edu/edissertations. This dissertation traces the rise of the deportation regime in the United States from 1942 to the present. It reveals that the origins of the regime are inextricably intertwined with the history of Mexican migration. It uses a diverse array of English- and Spanish-language archival sources from the United States and Read More

Causas e impactos de la deportación de migrantes centroamericanos de Estados Unidos a México

Causas e impactos de la deportación de migrantes centroamericanos de Estados Unidos a México (Simón Pedro Izcara Palacios y Karla Lorena Andrade Rubio, 2014). Durante la última década el número de migrantes expulsados con una orden de deportación de Estados Unidos a México casi se ha duplicado. No todos los migrantes deportados a México tienen nacionalidad mexicana, algunos son ciudadanos de países centroamericanos. Este artículo, fundamentado en una metodología cualitativa que incluye entrevistas en profundidad a 75 migrantes centroamericanos que Read More

Conditions Facing Guatemalans Deported from the US: Concerns and Recommendations for a Rights-Based Approach

Conditions Facing Guatemalans Deported from the US: Concerns and Recommendations for a Rights-Based Approach (2014, The Guatemalan Human Rights Commission) An average of two ICE planes arrive every day at the Guatemala City airport carrying Guatemalans deported from the US; some individuals are detained in the desert a few days after crossing into the United States while others have lived in the US for years. An ICE official recently estimated that a total of 50,000 Guatemalans were deported from the Read More

Case of Expelled Dominicans and Haitians v. Dominican Republic

CASE OF EXPELLED DOMINICANS AND HAITIANS v. DOMINICAN REPUBLIC (Inter-American Court of Human Rights 2014) Inter-American Court of Human Rights. 2014. Case of Expelled Dominicans and Haitians v. Dominican Republic. Submission of the case and synopsis: On July 12, 2012, in accordance with Articles 51 and 61 of the Convention, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (hereinafter “the Inter-American Commission” or “the Commission”) submitted to the Court case 12,271 against the State of the Dominican Republic (hereinafter “the State” or Read More

Deporting Fathers: Involuntary Transnational Families and Intent to Remigrate among Salvadoran Deportees

Deporting Fathers: Involuntary Transnational Families and Intent to Remigrate among Salvadoran Deportees (Jodi Berger Cardoso, Erin Randle Hamilton, Nestor Rodriguez, Karl Eschbach, Jacqueline Hagan, International Migration Review, 2016; Volume 50, Issue 1) One-fourth of deportees from the United States are parents of US-citizen children. We do not know how separation from families affects remigration among deportees, who face high penalties given unlawful reentry. We examined how family separation affects intent to remigrate among Salvadoran deportees. The majority of deportees with children Read More

Life After Deportation: Surviving as a Dominican Deportee

Life After Deportation: Surviving as a Dominican Deportee (Evan Rodkey, 2014) This thesis is the culmination of an ethnographic study centered on the survival strategies of deportees from the United States living in Santo Domingo, the capital of the Dominican Republic. The focus is on people who moved to the U.S. at a young age and later faced deportation as adults for conviction of a crime after spending many years—near lifetimes in many cases—in the U.S. Over the course of Read More

“Los Deportados”: The Transnational Blowback of the United States Deportation Practices and the Hidden Costs of Mass Deportations

“Los Deportados”: The Transnational Blowback of the United States Deportation Practices and the Hidden Costs of Mass Deportations (2013, Hansel Alejandro Aguilar – master’s thesis) The narratives of deportees’ experiences as they are forcibly returned “home” deserves more attention especially if the United States government fails to achieve comprehensive immigration reform in the near future. What is happening to los deportados we have been sending to their “homes” in Latin America that are struggling to maintain their societal structure with their current Read More

Is Deportation a Form of Forced Migration?

Is Deportation a Form of Forced Migration? (Matthew J. Gibney, Refugee Survey Quarterly (2013) 32 (2): 116-129). In this article I explore why, despite the fact that it seems to represent the epitome of forced migration, deportation (the quotidian practice of lawful expulsion) is generally ignored by forced migration scholars. My key claim is that deportation is implicitly deemed a legitimate form of forced migration. Forced migration is not simply a descriptive term; it is also typically an evaluative one. Read More

Turning Migrants into Criminals: The Harmful Impact of US Border Prosecutions

Turning Migrants into Criminals:  The Harmful Impact of US Border Prosecutions (Human Rights Watch 2013) Human Rights Watch. “Turning Migrants into Criminals: The Harmful Impact of US Border Prosecutions.” 2013. https://www.hrw.org/report/2013/05/22/turning-migrants-criminals/harmful-impact-us-border-prosecutions. Illegal entry and presence in the United States without authorization violate US civil immigration law and are punishable by removal from the country and other civil law penalties. The act of entering the United States without authorization (illegal entry) and the act of reentering after deportation (illegal reentry) are Read More

Post-Deportation Health: A Humanitarian Assessment

Post-Deportation Health: A Humanitarian Assessment (No More Deaths, 2012) Objective: This report explores the health impact of US repatriations on people returned to northern Mexico through interviews with adults in the border town of Nogales. The objective of the humanitarian assessment was to describe the perceptions of post-deportation health and the variables linked to higher risk or distress for deported men and women. Background: Nogales, Sonora, Mexico is a small city abutting the international boundary and adjacent to Nogales, Arizona. Read More

Illegal Emigration: The Continuing Life of Invalid Deportation Orders

Illegal Emigration: The Continuing Life of Invalid Deportation Orders (Richard Frankel, 2012) Federal appeals courts overturn more than one thousand deportation orders every year. A significant number of those reversals involve non-citizens who are abroad because they have been deported as a result of losing their cases at the administrative level. Although an order overturning a deportation order ordinarily restores non-citizens to their prior status of being lawfully present in the United States, federal immigration authorities have used the fact Read More