Is There Any Blood on My Hands? Deportation as a Crime of International Law

Is There Any Blood on My Hands? Deportation as a Crime of International Law (Chetail 2016) Chetail, Vincent. 2016. “Is There Any Blood on My Hands? Deportation as a Crime of International Law.” Leiden Journal of International Law 29 (3): 917–43. doi:10.1017/S0922156516000376. The present article revisits international criminal law as a tool for sanctioning the most patent abuses against migrants. Although deportation is traditionally considered as an attribute of the state inherent to its territorial sovereignty, this prerogative may degenerate Read More

“Where are we going to live?”: Migration and Statelessness in Haiti and the Dominican Republic

“Where are we going to live?”: Migration and Statelessness in Haiti and the Dominican Republic (Amnesty International 2016) Amnesty International. “‘Where Are We Going to Live?’: Migration and Statelessness in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.” 2016. https://www.amnestyusa.org/files/amr3641052016_where_am_i_going_to_live.compressed.pdf. In December 2013, the Dominican Republic set out an 18-month National Regularization Plan for Foreigners with Irregular Migration Status aimed at foreigners who had migrated to the Dominican Republic. In the same month, the government announced a suspension of all deportations, but promised Read More

Report on the Situation of Human Rights in the Dominican Republic

Report on the Situation of Human Rights in the Dominican Republic (IACHR 2015) Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. “Report on the Situation of Human Rights in the Dominican Republic.” 2015. http://www.oas.org/en/iachr/reports/pdfs/DominicanRepublic-2015.pdf. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights is presenting this report to examine the situation with regard to the rights to nationality, legal personality, equality and nondiscrimination, as well as other related human rights from the situation created by judgment TC/0168/13 of the Dominican Republic’s Constitutional Court on September 23, 2013. Read More

Authorized and Unauthorized Immigrant Parents: The Impact of Legal Vulnerability on Family Contexts

Authorized and Unauthorized Immigrant Parents: The Impact of Legal Vulnerability on Family Contexts (Kalina Brabeck, Erin Sibley, & M. Brinton Lykes, Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Science, 2016). This study explores the social-ecological contexts of unauthorized immigrant families and their U.S.-born children, through examining how otherwise similarly low-income, urban, Latino immigrant families differ on the basis of the parents’ legal status and interactions with the immigration system. Drawing on social-ecological theory, variations based on parents’ legal vulnerability among exosystem-level experiences (e.g., Read More

“Without Papers, I Am No One”: Stateless People in the Dominican Republic

“Without Papers, I Am No One”: Stateless People in the Dominican Republic (Amnesty International, 2015.) A 2013 Constitutional Court judgment (Judgment 168-13) has made statelessness a matter of law for several generations of Dominicans of foreign descent. This report shows that several groups of people, mostly of Haitian descent, living in the country remain stateless. People who are stateless in the Dominican Republic and lack identity documents are denied a range of human rights and prevented from participating fully in Read More

Case of Expelled Dominicans and Haitians v. Dominican Republic

CASE OF EXPELLED DOMINICANS AND HAITIANS v. DOMINICAN REPUBLIC (Inter-American Court of Human Rights 2014) Inter-American Court of Human Rights. 2014. Case of Expelled Dominicans and Haitians v. Dominican Republic. Submission of the case and synopsis: On July 12, 2012, in accordance with Articles 51 and 61 of the Convention, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (hereinafter “the Inter-American Commission” or “the Commission”) submitted to the Court case 12,271 against the State of the Dominican Republic (hereinafter “the State” or Read More

Life After Deportation: Surviving as a Dominican Deportee

Life After Deportation: Surviving as a Dominican Deportee (Evan Rodkey, 2014) This thesis is the culmination of an ethnographic study centered on the survival strategies of deportees from the United States living in Santo Domingo, the capital of the Dominican Republic. The focus is on people who moved to the U.S. at a young age and later faced deportation as adults for conviction of a crime after spending many years—near lifetimes in many cases—in the U.S. Over the course of Read More

Deporting Dominicans: Some Preliminary Findings

Deporting Dominicans: Some Preliminary Findings (2011, Charles R. Venator Santiago – 14 Harv. Latino L. Rev. 359) An essay is presented on the deportation of several Dominicans from the U.S. It mentions the deportation issues encountered by several Dominicans while living in the country and cites their struggles in dealing with the country’s immigration law. It denotes the legal process of removing Dominicans from the country, even those who have not committed any crime. The social condition of Dominicans in Read More

Displacement and stigma: The Social-psychological Crisis of the Deportee

Displacement and stigma: The Social-psychological Crisis of the Deportee (David C. Brotherton & Luis Barrios, Crime Media Culture vol. 5no. 1 29-55 (2009)) The phenomenon of forced repatriation for non-citizens has grown exponentially since the passing of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 and the Patriot Act of 2001. This development is the `natural’ result of the three wars on the globalized `other’: the war on drugs, the war on terrorism, and the war on the immigrant Read More