Foreign Farmworkers in Canada Fear Deportation If They Complain

Foreign Farmworkers in Canada Fear Deportation If They Complain  (Levin 2017) Levin, Dan. 2017. “Foreign Farmworkers in Canada Fear Deportation If They Complain.” The New York Times, August 13. Migrant farmworkers in Canada are often exploited and do not report complaints out of fear of being deported.  Canada’s seasonal agriculture worker program was set up to recruit migrants from Mexico and 11 Caribbean nations to work for up to eight months a year to address chronic labor shortages, but critics Read More

A Surge of Migrants Crossing Into Quebec Tests Canada’s Welcome

A Surge of Migrants Crossing Into Quebec Tests Canada’s Welcome (Levin 2017) Levin, Dan. 2017. “A Surge of Migrants Crossing Into Quebec Tests Canada’s Welcome.” The New York Times, August 10. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/10/world/americas/a-surge-of-migrants-crossing-into-quebec-tests-canadas-welcome.html. Despite the Canadian government’s lifting of a temporary protection policy for Haiti in 2014 leading to resuming deportations this past March, Haitians are continuing to flood over the U.S.’ northern border into Canada.  Around 1,500 asylum-seekers crossed the border into Quebec in July and according to the Canada Read More

Regulating the Human Supply Chain

Regulating the Human Supply Chain (Gordan 2017) Gordon, Jennifer. 2017. “Regulating the Human Supply Chain.” Iowa Law Review 102 (2): 445+. https://ilr.law.uiowa.edu/print/volume-102-issue-2/regulating-the-human-supply-chain/. Legal scholarship has failed to take note of the increasing impact of recruitment intermediaries on the rule of law in the United States, and on the regulation of employment in U.S. low-wage labor markets in particular.  This Article fills that gap for forming a novel conceptual framing of migrant recruitment as a “human supply chain.”  It builds on this Read More

Rebuilding Self and Country: Deportee Reintegration in Jamaica

Rebuilding Self and Country: Deportee Reintegration in Jamaica (Bernard Headley and Dragan Milovanovic, 2016, Migration Policy Institute) More than 45,000 Jamaicans were deported from abroad between 2000 and 2014, primarily from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada. Each month these countries return more than 100 Jamaicans on average to a nation grappling with persistently high levels of crime and poverty. Deportees are not greeted with open arms upon return, in part due to a widely held view in Read More

The case against removal: Jus noci and harm in deportation practice

The case against removal: Jus noci and harm in deportation practice (Barbara Buckinx & Alexandra Filindra, Migr Stud (2015) 3 (3): 393-416) The United States removes from its territory almost 400,000 noncitizens annually—Germany removes about 50,000 people each year, France 26,000, and Canada 12,000. In this article, we focus on the impact of removal, and we argue that many individuals—often those who are best integrated in their countries of long-term residence—will suffer significant physical, psychological, economic, and social harm upon their return. Read More

Citizenship Revocation, the Privilege to Have Rights and the Production of the Alien

Citizenship Revocation, the Privilege to Have Rights and the Production of the Alien (Audrey Macklin, 40:1 Queen’s LJ, 2014) Since 9/11, Western governments have redefined what it means to be a citizen. Though citizenship is often thought of as an inalienable right, the emergence of the “homegrown ” terrorist has called into question whether certain citizens deserve the protection that citizenship status provides. Although international treaties preclude a country from rendering a person stateless, recent legislative and executive action in the Read More

The Reintegration of Criminal Deportees in Society

The Reintegration of Criminal Deportees in Society (2010, Christopher A.D. Charles) This article deals with reintegrating deportees in Jamaica. There is the belief among the citizenry, the media, and the government that the deportees are fueling the crime rate. Jamaica has one of the highest homicide rates in the world. Some 15,618 deportees were sent to Jamaica from various countries between 2005 and 2009. The purveyors of the deportee–crime link ignore the influence of garrison communities on the crime rate which Read More

There’s No Place Like Home: States’ Obligations in Relation to Transfers of Persons

There’s No Place Like Home: States’ Obligations in Relation to Transfers of Persons (2008, Emanuela-Chiara Gillard) The article sets out states’ obligations in relation to transfers of persons under international law, and revisits the key elements of the principled non-refoulement, including its application where persons are transferred from one state to another within the territory of a single state; the range of risks that give rise to application of the principle; important procedural elements; and the impact on the principle of Read More