Understanding Secondary Immigration Enforcement: Immigrant Youth and Family Separation in a Border County

Understanding Secondary Immigration Enforcement: Immigrant Youth and Family Separation in a Border County (Nina Rabin, Journal of Law and Education, 47 (1), 2018). In debates over immigration reform, young people in immigrant families are often characterized as a distinct population, with claims and interests entirely separate from those of their parents. Bifurcating the undocumented population between children and parents over-simplifies how immigration enforcement impacts families. This article challenges the dichotomy between children and parents by studying how young people, regardless of Read More

Crossing Borders and Criminalizing Identity: The Disintegrated Subjects of Administrative Sanctions

Crossing Borders and Criminalizing Identity: The Disintegrated Subjects of Administrative Sanctions. (Keramet Reiter and Susan Bibler Coutin, Law and Society Review, 51 (567). 2017) This paper draws on in-depth, qualitative interviews that examine individual experiences in two different legal contexts: deportation regimes and supermax prisons. Through putting these contexts and experiences into dialogue, we identify common legal processes of punishment experiences across both contexts. Specifically, the U.S. legal system re-labels immigrants (as deportable noncitizens) and supermax prisoners (as dangerous gang offenders). This Read More

Four Years On: Humane Solutions to Offshore Detention Exist but Government Chooses Abuse

Four Years On: Humane Solutions to Offshore Detention Exist but Government Chooses Abuse (Amnesty International, 2017). On a day that marks four long years of the Australian Government’s deliberately abusive policies Amnesty International is pleading for an immediate plan to guarantee the safety of the two thousand people trapped on Nauru and Manus Island.

Back to Square One: Socioeconomic Integration of Deported Migrants

Back to Square One: Socioeconomic Integration of Deported Migrants (Anda M. David, International Migration Review, 51: 127–154, 2017) This paper addresses the issue of socioeconomic integration of forced return migrants, focusing on the Maghreb countries. Starting from the hypothesis that the return has to be prepared, I tested whether a disruption in the migration cycle (such as deportation) increases the individual’s vulnerability and affects his integration from both a structural and sociocultural point of view, using the 2006 Migration de Read More

Separated Families: Barriers to Family Reunification After Deportation

Separated Families: Barriers to Family Reunification After Deportation (Deborah A. Boehm, Journal on Migration and Human Security, 2017) This paper outlines the complexities — and unlikelihood — of keeping families together when facing, or in the aftermath of deportation. After discussing the context that limits or prevents reunification among immigrant families more generally, I outline several of the particular ways that families are divided when a member is deported. Drawing on case studies from longitudinal ethnographic research in Mexico and Read More

Trauma and Psychological Distress in Latino Citizen Children Following Parental Detention and Deportation

Trauma and Psychological Distress in Latino Citizen Children Following Parental Detention and Deportation (Lisseth Rojas-Flores, Mari L. Clements, J. Hwang Koo, and Judy London, Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, Vol 9(3), May 2017 The mental health impact of parental detention and deportation on citizen children is a topic of increasing concern. Forced parent– child separation and parental loss are potentially traumatic events (PTEs) with adverse effects on children’s mental health. Objective: This study examines posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and Read More

Left Behind: The Dying Principle of Family Reunification Under Immigration Law

Left Behind: The Dying Principle of Family Reunification Under Immigration Law (Anita Ortiz Maddali, 50 U. Mich. J. L. Reform 107 (2016)) A key underpinning of modern U.S. immigration law is family reunification, but in practice it can privilege certain families and certain members within families. Drawing on legislative history, this Article examines the origins and objectives of the principle of family reunification in immigration law and relies on legal scholarship and sociological and anthropological research to reveal how contemporary immigration Read More

Back to Square One: Socioeconomic Integration of Deported Migrants

Back to Square One: Socioeconomic Integration of Deported Migrants (Anda M. David, International Migration Review, Vol. 51, Issue 1, 2017) This paper addresses the issue of socioeconomic integration of forced return migrants, focusing on the Maghreb countries. Starting from the hypothesis that the return has to be prepared, I tested whether a disruption in the migration cycle (such as deportation) increases the individual’s vulnerability and affects his integration from both a structural and sociocultural point of view, using the 2006 Migration de Read More

Post-Deportation Risks and Monitoring Mini-Feature

Post-Deportation Risks and Monitoring Mini-Feature (Forced Migration Review, vol. 54, February 2017) People whose application for asylum has been refused are often deported, usually to their country of origin. Little is known, however, about what happens to them on that return journey, on arrival in the country to which they are deported, and during the weeks and months that follow. The articles in this mini-feature examine four cases: failed asylum seekers deported to the Democratic Republic of Congo, Sri Lanka and Read More

Mass Deportations Would Impoverish US Families and Create Immense Social Costs

Mass Deportations Would Impoverish US Families and Create Immense Social Costs (Robert Warren & Donald Kerwin, Center for Migration Studies, 2017) This paper provides a statistical portrait of the US undocumented population, with an emphasis on the social and economic condition of mixed-status households – that is, households that contain a US citizen and an undocumented resident. It is based primarily on data compiled by the Center for Migration Studies (CMS). Major findings include the following: There were 3.3 million mixed-status households Read More

Returning with Nothing but an Empty Bag: Topographies of Social Hope after Deportation to Ghana

Returning with Nothing but an Empty Bag: Topographies of Social Hope after Deportation to Ghana (Nauja Kleist), chapter in “Hope and Uncertainty in Contemporary African Migration” Nauja Kleist and Dorte Thorsen (eds.), New York and London: Web: Routledge (2017). This chapter addresses post-deportation life in Ghana, discussing two issues: first, social and economic repercusssions of deportation for deportees, their families and local community; second how high-risk migration projects continues to constitute a pathway of hope for some deportees. Based on longitudinal Read More

Migration and Belonging: Narratives from a Highland Town

Migration and Belonging: Narratives from a Highland Town (collection of blog posts, introduction by Lauren Heidbrink, 2016) Youth Circulations is honored to showcase the important contributions of Guatemalan scholars in a new multilingual series entitled “Migration and Belonging: Narratives from a Highland Town.” This 7-part series emerges from a longitudinal study on the deportation and social reintegration of youth in Guatemala and Southern Mexico. With generous funding from the National Science Foundation, an interdisciplinary team conducted ethnographic and survey research Read More

Post-Deportation Risks: People Face Insecurity and Threats After Forced Returns

Post-Deportation Risks: People Face Insecurity and Threats After Forced Returns (Maybritt Jill Alpes & Ninna Nyberg Sørensen, Danish Institute for Policy Studies Policy Brief, November 2016) This brief takes a look at the risks migrants and rejected asylum seekers face when they’re forcibly returned to their point of origin. The text’s authors specifically argue that forced returns have become unduly criminalized and expose returnees to economic deprivation and psychosocial harm, often at the hands of predatory state agents.

Feeling like a citizen, living as a denizen: Deportees’ sense of belonging

Feeling like a citizen, living as a denizen: Deportees’ sense of belonging (Tanya Golash-Boza, American Behavioral Scientist, 60(13), 2016) The implementation of restrictive immigration laws in 1997 in the United States has led to the deportation of hundreds of thousands of legal permanent residents—denizens who had made the United States their home. Mass deportations of denizens have given renewed importance to territorial belonging and legal citizenship for theories of citizenship, a relatively neglected area of scholarship in this field. This Read More

Self-perceived Health and Quality of Life Among Azorean Deportees: A Cross Sectional Descriptive Study

Self-perceived Health and Quality of Life Among Azorean Deportees: A Cross Sectional Descriptive Study (Maryellen D. Brisbois, Kristen A. Sethares, Helena Oliveira Silva, Helder Rocha Pereira, SpringerPlus, 2016) Background Immigration policies can cause significant public health consequences, posing detrimental social and health effects for migrants, their families and communities. Migrants often face obstacles to health due to access, discrimination, language and cultural barriers, legal status, economic difficulties, social isolation, and fear of deportation. The process of deportation has become more Read More

Traumatic Events and Symptoms Among Mexican Deportees in a Border Community

Traumatic Events and Symptoms Among Mexican Deportees in a Border Community (Juan M. Peña, et. al, 2016, Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2017) Research on traumatic events experienced among Mexicans deported from the United States is scant. Using clinical interviews, this study assessed the frequency of traumatic events and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among 47 Mexican deportees in a U.S.-Mexico border community. The majority of participants (98%) reported having experienced one or more Read More

Detained, Deceived, and Deported: Experiences of Recently Deported Central American Families

Detained, Deceived, and Deported: Experiences of Recently Deported Central American Families (Guillermo Cantor and Tory Johnson, American Immigration Council, 2016) Over the last few years, the escalation of violence in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala (collectively known as the Northern Triangle of Central America) has reached dramatic levels. thousands of women and their children have fled and arrived in the United states with the hope of finding protection. But for many of them, their attempts to escape merely resulted in Read More

Examining an Increasingly Complex Tapestry: The Unintended Effects of the Three- and Ten-Year Unlawful Presence Bars

Examining an Increasingly Complex Tapestry: The Unintended Effects of the Three- and Ten-Year Unlawful Presence Bars (Kristi Lundstrom, 76 Law & Contemp. Prob. 389, 2013) In 1996, Congress passed the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA), focusing immigration law and policy on greater enforcement and centering the enforcement system around departures, in an attempt to deter immigrants from overstaying their visas. One major enforcement tool instituted by IIRIRA was the creation of three-and ten-year “unlawful presence” (ULP) bars, which Read More

Desert, detention, and deportation: Mexican women’s descriptions of migration stressors and sources of strength

Desert, detention, and deportation: Mexican women’s descriptions of migration stressors and sources of strength (Ruth Ann Belknap, Health Care for Women International, 37 (9), 2016) I analyzed interviews ( n = 10) of women recently deported from the United States of America to Mexico, exploring what women experienced immediately after deportation. The women who were residing in a short-term shelter in Nogales, Mexico, described their greatest stressors and sources of strength. Women identified the border crossing experience, apprehension, detention, and family Read More

Constructions of Deportability in Sweden: Refused Asylum Seekers’ Experiences in Relation to Gender, Family Life, and Reproduction

Constructions of Deportability in Sweden: Refused Asylum Seekers’ Experiences in Relation to Gender, Family Life, and Reproduction (Maja Sager, Nordic Journal of Women’s Studies, Vol. 24, 2016) Drawing on ethnographic material, this article examines how the experiences of refused asylum seekers in Sweden are shaped by migration policies, welfare policies, and gender norms. The article develops a feminist account of deportability to examine some gendered and reproductive aspects of everyday experiences of seeking asylum in Sweden. Focusing on the interview accounts Read More

Reshaping possible futures: Deportation, home and the United Kingdom

Reshaping possible futures: Deportation, home and the United Kingdom (Ines Hasselberg, Anthropology Today, Volume 32, Issue 1, February 2016 ) In this article I examine how foreign nationals in the United Kingdom (UK) envisage the possibility of a forced return to their countries of origin. Drawing on ethnographic data collected in London among foreign national offenders appealing their deportation at the Immigration Tribunal, I show how preparations for an eventual return were seldom made by those appealing deportation, even if the prospect Read More

Rights and Reintegrating Deported Migrants for National Development: The Jamaican Model

Rights and Reintegrating Deported Migrants for National Development: The Jamaican Model (Bernard Headley & Dragan Milovanovic, Social Justice, 43.1, 2016). Each year, the US, the UK, and Canada together deport hundreds of thousands of people. Under President Barack Obama, US deportations were on track to hit a record two million by the end of 2014-nearly the same number of persons deported between 1892 and 1997 (New York Times 2013). In 2013, 50,741 persons were deported from the UK, or they Read More

Reducing the Deportation’s Harm by Expanding Constitutional Protections to Functional Americans

Reducing the Deportation’s Harm by Expanding Constitutional Protections to Functional Americans (Beth Caldwell, 37 Whittier L. Rev. 355, 2016) This paper draws upon primary research conducted with deportees in Mexico to highlight the need to extend constitutional protections to deportation proceedings. Deportation is particularly cruel for those who have become integrated into American society. People are permanently separated from their spouses and children, and from the only country that they have ever considered to be their home. This experience often triggers Read More

Authorized and Unauthorized Immigrant Parents: The Impact of Legal Vulnerability on Family Contexts

Authorized and Unauthorized Immigrant Parents: The Impact of Legal Vulnerability on Family Contexts (Kalina Brabeck, Erin Sibley, & M. Brinton Lykes, Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Science, 2016). This study explores the social-ecological contexts of unauthorized immigrant families and their U.S.-born children, through examining how otherwise similarly low-income, urban, Latino immigrant families differ on the basis of the parents’ legal status and interactions with the immigration system. Drawing on social-ecological theory, variations based on parents’ legal vulnerability among exosystem-level experiences (e.g., Read More

Stopping the Revolving Door: Reception and Reintegration Services for Central American Deportees

Stopping the Revolving Door: Reception and Reintegration Services for Central American Deportees (Victoria Rietig & Rodrigo Dominguez Villegas, Migration Policy Institute, 2016) In the past five years, hundreds of thousands of Central American migrants deported from Mexico and the United States—including tens of thousands of children—have arrived back in the Northern Triangle countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. For many deportees, the conditions upon arrival are worse than those that compelled them to leave in the first place. They and their Read More

Flights of Shame or Dignified Return? Return Flights and Post-Return Monitoring

Flights of Shame or Dignified Return? Return Flights and Post-Return Monitoring (Jari Pirjola, European Journal of Migration and Law 17(4):305-328 · November 2015) The purpose of this article is to discuss return flights in the context of international human rights standards. What are the standards that have so far been developed by international organisations and the international monitoring bodies and how these standards have been applied in practice during return flights? Besides evolving standards, the paper discusses unclarities that need to be addressed Read More

Migrants Deported from the United States and Mexico to the Northern Triangle: A Statistical and Socioeconomic Profile

Migrants Deported from the United States and Mexico to the Northern Triangle: A Statistical and Socioeconomic Profile (2015, Rodrigo Dominguez Villegas & Victoria Rietig) The United States and Mexico have apprehended nearly 1 million Salvadoran, Guatemalan, and Honduran migrants since 2010, deporting more than 800,000 of them, including more than 40,000 children. While the United States led in pace and number of apprehensions of Central Americans in 2010-2014, Mexico pulled ahead in 2015. Amid increasingly muscular enforcement by Mexico, U.S. Read More

Humane and Dignified? Migrants’ Experience of Living in a ‘State of Deportability’ in Sweden

Humane and Dignified? Migrants’ Experience of Living in a ‘State of Deportability’ in Sweden (Daniela Debono, et al., 2015) The return of irregular migrants to their country of origin is an integral part of the European Union’s strategy for managing international migration. As we write, in June 2015, the European Commissioner, Dimitris Avramopoulos, in reaction to the lack of agreement between Member States on a comprehensive European Agenda on Migration and to increasing irregular migrant flows through the southern borders, Read More

The Health Implications of Deportation Policy

The Health Implications of Deportation Policy (Juliana E. Morris & Daniel Palazuelos, Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved; 26(2):406-9, May 2015) The United States detains and deports over 400,000 people annually. This large-scale effort has important consequences for the health of affected individuals and communities. A growing body of research suggests that deportation increases stress and mental illness, economic deprivation, and individual exposure to violence, while also contributing to destabilization and crime at the community level. The Read More

Deportation Stigma and Re-migration

Deportation Stigma and Re-migration (Liza Schuster & Nassim Majidi, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Volume 41, Number 4, 21 March 2015, pp. 635-652(18)) Many, if not most, of those who are forcibly expelled from the country to which they have migrated will not settle in the country to which they have been returned but will leave again. A recent article examined some of the reasons why this should be so. It was argued that in addition to the factors that Read More

Deporting Social Capital: Implications for immigrant communities in the United States

Deporting Social Capital: Implications for immigrant communities in the United States (Jacqueline Hagan, David Leal & Nestor Rodriguez, Migr Stud (2015) 3 (3): 370-392) The United States currently removes approximately 400,000 individual migrants each year, which represents close to an eightfold increase since the mid-1990s. While scholars have studied the consequences of such policies for children and families, this article posits broader effects on communities through the reduction of immigrant social and human capital. Using findings from three studies of immigrant communities and Read More

The case against removal: Jus noci and harm in deportation practice

The case against removal: Jus noci and harm in deportation practice (Barbara Buckinx & Alexandra Filindra, Migr Stud (2015) 3 (3): 393-416) The United States removes from its territory almost 400,000 noncitizens annually—Germany removes about 50,000 people each year, France 26,000, and Canada 12,000. In this article, we focus on the impact of removal, and we argue that many individuals—often those who are best integrated in their countries of long-term residence—will suffer significant physical, psychological, economic, and social harm upon their return. Read More

Smart(er) Enforcement: Rethinking Removal, Structuring Proportionality, and Imagining Graduated Sanctions

Smart(er) Enforcement: Rethinking Removal, Structuring Proportionality, and Imagining Graduated Sanctions (2015, Daniel Kanstroom) This Article is a foray into deep waters. Its main purpose is to sketch and to justify a better framework for interior immigration enforcement. Such a framework should satisfy two major goals. First, it should engage meaningfully with “public order,” operational efficiency, and basic human rights. Put another way, it must be both effective and legitimate. Second, it should govern the major aspects of interior immigration enforcement Read More

Deportation, Anxiety, Justice: New Ethnographic Perspectives

Deportation, Anxiety, Justice: New Ethnographic Perspectives (Heike Drotbohm & Ines Hasselberg, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Volume 41, 2015 – Issue 4) This paper introduces a collection of articles that share ethnographic perspectives on the intersections between deportation, anxiety and justice. As a form of expulsion regulating human mobility, deportation policies may be justified by public authorities as measures responding to anxieties over (unregulated) migration. At the same time, they also bring out uncertainty and unrest to deportable/deported migrants Read More

The Reversal of Migratory Family Lives: A Cape Verdean Perspective on Gender and Sociality pre- and post-deportation

The Reversal of Migratory Family Lives: A Cape Verdean Perspective on Gender and Sociality Pre- and Post-deportation (Heike Drotbohm, 2014) Deportation, as a coerced and involuntary mode of return migration, contradicts common assumptions and understandings of transnational livelihoods. This can be felt particularly strongly in the realm of the family—the social sphere where migration is facilitated and enacted. Drawing on anthropological fieldwork in Cape Verdean transnational social fields, this paper applies a gendered perspective in examining how deportation affects individual Read More

Causas e impactos de la deportación de migrantes centroamericanos de Estados Unidos a México

Causas e impactos de la deportación de migrantes centroamericanos de Estados Unidos a México (Simón Pedro Izcara Palacios y Karla Lorena Andrade Rubio, 2014). Durante la última década el número de migrantes expulsados con una orden de deportación de Estados Unidos a México casi se ha duplicado. No todos los migrantes deportados a México tienen nacionalidad mexicana, algunos son ciudadanos de países centroamericanos. Este artículo, fundamentado en una metodología cualitativa que incluye entrevistas en profundidad a 75 migrantes centroamericanos que Read More

Deporting Fathers: Involuntary Transnational Families and Intent to Remigrate among Salvadoran Deportees

Deporting Fathers: Involuntary Transnational Families and Intent to Remigrate among Salvadoran Deportees (Jodi Berger Cardoso, Erin Randle Hamilton, Nestor Rodriguez, Karl Eschbach, Jacqueline Hagan, International Migration Review, 2016; Volume 50, Issue 1) One-fourth of deportees from the United States are parents of US-citizen children. We do not know how separation from families affects remigration among deportees, who face high penalties given unlawful reentry. We examined how family separation affects intent to remigrate among Salvadoran deportees. The majority of deportees with children Read More

Life After Deportation: Surviving as a Dominican Deportee

Life After Deportation: Surviving as a Dominican Deportee (Evan Rodkey, 2014) This thesis is the culmination of an ethnographic study centered on the survival strategies of deportees from the United States living in Santo Domingo, the capital of the Dominican Republic. The focus is on people who moved to the U.S. at a young age and later faced deportation as adults for conviction of a crime after spending many years—near lifetimes in many cases—in the U.S. Over the course of Read More

“Don’t Deport Our Daddies”: Gendering State Deportation Practices and Immigrant Organizing

“Don’t Deport Our Daddies”: Gendering State Deportation Practices and Immigrant Organizing (Manisha Das Gupta, Gender & Society, Vol 28, Issue 1, 2014) New York based Families For Freedom (FFF) is among a handful of organizations that directly organize deportees and their families. Analyzing the organization’s resignification of criminalized men of color as caregivers, I argue that current deportation policies and practices reorganize care work and kinship while tying gender and sexuality to national belonging. These policies and practices severely compromise Read More

Addition by Subtraction? A Longitudinal Analysis of the Impact of Deportation Efforts on Violent Crime

Addition by Subtraction? A Longitudinal Analysis of the Impact of Deportation Efforts on Violent Crime (Jacob I. Stowell, Steven F. Messner, Michael S. Barton, Lawrence E. Raffalovich, Law & Society Review,  47(4), 2013). Contemporary criminological research on immigration has focused largely on one aspect of the immigration process, namely, the impact of in‐migration (i.e., presence or arrival) of foreign‐born individuals on crime. A related but understudied aspect of the immigration process is the impact that the removal of certain segments of Read More

Lack of Detained Parents’ Access to the Family Justice System and the Unjust Severance of the Parent-Child Relationship

Lack of Detained Parents’ Access to the Family Justice System and the Unjust Severance of the Parent-Child Relationship (2013, Sarah Rogerson) Immigration law enforcement has numerous intended and unintended consequences for immigrant families. When a parent is detained as a result of immigration enforcement activities, their ability to access to the family justice system is limited and there are few, if any, due process protections afforded to them. As a result, it is now well-documented that children of detained parents have Read More

Parental Deportation, Families, and Mental Health

Parental Deportation, Families, and Mental Health (Schuyler W. Henderson, M.D., M.P.H. & Charles D.R. Baily, M.S., Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 52, Issue 5, May 2013) There are an estimated 5.5 million children in the United States whose parents are unauthorized immigrants, and approximately three fourths of these children are American citizens. For these children, parental deportation is a real threat. From 1998 through 2007, more than 100,000 parents of U.S. citizen children were deported. Since then, immigration Read More

Exploring Parent-Child Communication in the Context of Threat: Mixed-status families facing detention and deportation in post 9/11 USA.

Exploring Parent-Child Communication in the Context of Threat:  Mixed-status families facing detention and deportation in post 9/11 USA.  (M. Brinton Lykes, Kalina M. Brabeck & Cristina Hunter. Community, Work and Family, 16(2), 123-146 (2013)). This paper explores whether and how documented and undocumented migrant parents communicate with their children about the threats posed by the intensified enforcement of 1996 and 2001 US immigration reforms; whether parents facing potential detention and deportation plan for the care of their children; and whether their Read More

Unintended and Unavoidable: The Failure to Protect Rule and Its Consequences for Undocumented Parents and their Children

Unintended and Unavoidable: The Failure to Protect Rule and Its Consequences for Undocumented Parents and their Children (Sarah Hill Rogerson, 2012) Parents without immigration status in the United States regularly face the threat of deportation and separation from their children. When an undocumented parent is brought to the attention of law enforcement through the child welfare system, they also face the potential of the loss of legal custodial rights to their children. The child welfare system and immigration enforcement mechanisms Read More

The Family Rights of European Children: Expulsion of Non-European Parents

The Family Rights of European Children: Expulsion of Non-European Parents (Gareth T. Davies, 2012) In Ruiz Zambrano and Dereci the European Court of Justice found that EU law prohibits expulsion of a family member of a Union citizen if that expulsion would force the Union citizen to leave the Union too. This is of particular importance where the Union citizen is a child, since children are particularly dependent upon their parents and perhaps cannot be expected to remain behind without Read More

Separation, Deportation, Termination

Separation, Deportation, Termination (Marcia Yablon-Zug, 32 B.C. J.L. & Soc. Just. 63 (2012)). There is a growing practice of separating immigrant children from their deportable parents. Parental fitness is no longer the standard with regard to undocumented immigrant parents. Increasingly, fit undocumented parents must convince courts and welfare agencies that continuing or resuming parental custody is in their child’s best interest. This requirement is unique to immigrant parents and can have a disastrous impact on their ability to retain custody of Read More

Working with Deported Individuals in the Pacific: Legal and Ethical Issues

Working with Deported Individuals in the Pacific: Legal and Ethical Issues (UNDP Pacific Centre, 2012) Deportation as described by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) refers to “the act of a State in the exercise of its sovereignty in removing an alien from its territory to a certain place after refusal of admission or termination of permission to remain.” Therefore, for criminal deportation cases this refers to the removal of an alien (non-citizen) after committing a criminal act in the Read More

Disappearing Parents: Immigration Enforcement and the Child Welfare System

Disappearing Parents: Immigration Enforcement and the Child Welfare System (Nina Rabin, 2011) This Article presents original empirical research that documents systemic failures of the federal immigration enforcement and state child welfare systems when immigrant parents in detention and deportation proceedings have children in state custody. The intertwined but uncoordinated workings of the federal and state systems result in severe family disruptions and raise concerns regarding parental rights of constitutional magnitude. This Article documents this phenomenon in two ways. First, it Read More

Deporting Dominicans: Some Preliminary Findings

Deporting Dominicans: Some Preliminary Findings (2011, Charles R. Venator Santiago – 14 Harv. Latino L. Rev. 359) An essay is presented on the deportation of several Dominicans from the U.S. It mentions the deportation issues encountered by several Dominicans while living in the country and cites their struggles in dealing with the country’s immigration law. It denotes the legal process of removing Dominicans from the country, even those who have not committed any crime. The social condition of Dominicans in Read More