Understanding Secondary Immigration Enforcement: Immigrant Youth and Family Separation in a Border County

Understanding Secondary Immigration Enforcement: Immigrant Youth and Family Separation in a Border County (Nina Rabin, Journal of Law and Education, 47 (1), 2018). In debates over immigration reform, young people in immigrant families are often characterized as a distinct population, with claims and interests entirely separate from those of their parents. Bifurcating the undocumented population between children and parents over-simplifies how immigration enforcement impacts families. This article challenges the dichotomy between children and parents by studying how young people, regardless of Read More

Four Years On: Humane Solutions to Offshore Detention Exist but Government Chooses Abuse

Four Years On: Humane Solutions to Offshore Detention Exist but Government Chooses Abuse (Amnesty International, 2017). On a day that marks four long years of the Australian Government’s deliberately abusive policies Amnesty International is pleading for an immediate plan to guarantee the safety of the two thousand people trapped on Nauru and Manus Island.

Left Behind: The Dying Principle of Family Reunification Under Immigration Law

Left Behind: The Dying Principle of Family Reunification Under Immigration Law (Anita Ortiz Maddali, 50 U. Mich. J. L. Reform 107 (2016)) A key underpinning of modern U.S. immigration law is family reunification, but in practice it can privilege certain families and certain members within families. Drawing on legislative history, this Article examines the origins and objectives of the principle of family reunification in immigration law and relies on legal scholarship and sociological and anthropological research to reveal how contemporary immigration Read More

God Brought You Home – Deportation as Moral Governance in the Lives of Nigerian Sex Worker Migrants

God Brought You Home – Deportation as Moral Governance in the Lives of Nigerian Sex Worker Migrants (Sine Plambech, Journal Of Ethnic And Migration Studies, 2017) Set in Nigeria among deported sex worker migrants and the institutions that seek to intervene in their migration, this article explores how deportation serves the dual function as a tool for migration governance as well as a tool for moral governance. Deportation has often been analysed from a Global North perspective and as a technology Read More

Migration and Belonging: Narratives from a Highland Town

Migration and Belonging: Narratives from a Highland Town (collection of blog posts, introduction by Lauren Heidbrink, 2016) Youth Circulations is honored to showcase the important contributions of Guatemalan scholars in a new multilingual series entitled “Migration and Belonging: Narratives from a Highland Town.” This 7-part series emerges from a longitudinal study on the deportation and social reintegration of youth in Guatemala and Southern Mexico. With generous funding from the National Science Foundation, an interdisciplinary team conducted ethnographic and survey research Read More

Tackling the Global Refugee Crisis: From Shirking to Sharing Responsibility

Tackling the Global Refugee Crisis: From Shirking to Sharing Responsibility (Amnesty International, Oct. 2016) On 19 September 2016 the United Nations (UN) General Assembly collectively, and spectacularly, failed the 21 million refugees of this world. The “High-level Summit to address large movements of refugees and migrants” was to address the global refugee crisis, a crisis in which, daily, millions fleeing war and persecution in countries like Syria, South Sudan, Myanmar and Iraq suffer intolerable misery and human rights violations. World Read More

Constructions of Deportability in Sweden: Refused Asylum Seekers’ Experiences in Relation to Gender, Family Life, and Reproduction

Constructions of Deportability in Sweden: Refused Asylum Seekers’ Experiences in Relation to Gender, Family Life, and Reproduction (Maja Sager, Nordic Journal of Women’s Studies, Vol. 24, 2016) Drawing on ethnographic material, this article examines how the experiences of refused asylum seekers in Sweden are shaped by migration policies, welfare policies, and gender norms. The article develops a feminist account of deportability to examine some gendered and reproductive aspects of everyday experiences of seeking asylum in Sweden. Focusing on the interview accounts Read More

The Reversal of Migratory Family Lives: A Cape Verdean Perspective on Gender and Sociality pre- and post-deportation

The Reversal of Migratory Family Lives: A Cape Verdean Perspective on Gender and Sociality Pre- and Post-deportation (Heike Drotbohm, 2014) Deportation, as a coerced and involuntary mode of return migration, contradicts common assumptions and understandings of transnational livelihoods. This can be felt particularly strongly in the realm of the family—the social sphere where migration is facilitated and enacted. Drawing on anthropological fieldwork in Cape Verdean transnational social fields, this paper applies a gendered perspective in examining how deportation affects individual Read More

“Don’t Deport Our Daddies”: Gendering State Deportation Practices and Immigrant Organizing

“Don’t Deport Our Daddies”: Gendering State Deportation Practices and Immigrant Organizing (Manisha Das Gupta, Gender & Society, Vol 28, Issue 1, 2014) New York based Families For Freedom (FFF) is among a handful of organizations that directly organize deportees and their families. Analyzing the organization’s resignification of criminalized men of color as caregivers, I argue that current deportation policies and practices reorganize care work and kinship while tying gender and sexuality to national belonging. These policies and practices severely compromise Read More

Lack of Detained Parents’ Access to the Family Justice System and the Unjust Severance of the Parent-Child Relationship

Lack of Detained Parents’ Access to the Family Justice System and the Unjust Severance of the Parent-Child Relationship (2013, Sarah Rogerson) Immigration law enforcement has numerous intended and unintended consequences for immigrant families. When a parent is detained as a result of immigration enforcement activities, their ability to access to the family justice system is limited and there are few, if any, due process protections afforded to them. As a result, it is now well-documented that children of detained parents have Read More

Exploring Parent-Child Communication in the Context of Threat: Mixed-status families facing detention and deportation in post 9/11 USA.

Exploring Parent-Child Communication in the Context of Threat:  Mixed-status families facing detention and deportation in post 9/11 USA.  (M. Brinton Lykes, Kalina M. Brabeck & Cristina Hunter. Community, Work and Family, 16(2), 123-146 (2013)). This paper explores whether and how documented and undocumented migrant parents communicate with their children about the threats posed by the intensified enforcement of 1996 and 2001 US immigration reforms; whether parents facing potential detention and deportation plan for the care of their children; and whether their Read More

Global Care Chain: A Critical Introduction

Global Care Chain: A Critical Introduction (Nicola Yeates, Global Migration Perspectives, 44: 1-20, 2005) The ‘global care chain’ concept is attracting attention across a range of social science fields, in particular globalisation studies, migration studies, care studies and gender studies. This paper provides a critical introduction to that concept, a general discussion of the merits of the concept and ways in which its usefulness might be enhanced. The discussion begins by reviewing the origins and general features of the ‘global care Read More