Understanding Secondary Immigration Enforcement: Immigrant Youth and Family Separation in a Border County

Understanding Secondary Immigration Enforcement: Immigrant Youth and Family Separation in a Border County (Nina Rabin, Journal of Law and Education, 47 (1), 2018). In debates over immigration reform, young people in immigrant families are often characterized as a distinct population, with claims and interests entirely separate from those of their parents. Bifurcating the undocumented population between children and parents over-simplifies how immigration enforcement impacts families. This article challenges the dichotomy between children and parents by studying how young people, regardless of Read More

Foreign Farmworkers in Canada Fear Deportation If They Complain

Foreign Farmworkers in Canada Fear Deportation If They Complain  (Levin 2017) Levin, Dan. 2017. “Foreign Farmworkers in Canada Fear Deportation If They Complain.” The New York Times, August 13. Migrant farmworkers in Canada are often exploited and do not report complaints out of fear of being deported.  Canada’s seasonal agriculture worker program was set up to recruit migrants from Mexico and 11 Caribbean nations to work for up to eight months a year to address chronic labor shortages, but critics Read More

A Surge of Migrants Crossing Into Quebec Tests Canada’s Welcome

A Surge of Migrants Crossing Into Quebec Tests Canada’s Welcome (Levin 2017) Levin, Dan. 2017. “A Surge of Migrants Crossing Into Quebec Tests Canada’s Welcome.” The New York Times, August 10. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/10/world/americas/a-surge-of-migrants-crossing-into-quebec-tests-canadas-welcome.html. Despite the Canadian government’s lifting of a temporary protection policy for Haiti in 2014 leading to resuming deportations this past March, Haitians are continuing to flood over the U.S.’ northern border into Canada.  Around 1,500 asylum-seekers crossed the border into Quebec in July and according to the Canada Read More

Four Years On: Humane Solutions to Offshore Detention Exist but Government Chooses Abuse

Four Years On: Humane Solutions to Offshore Detention Exist but Government Chooses Abuse (Amnesty International, 2017). On a day that marks four long years of the Australian Government’s deliberately abusive policies Amnesty International is pleading for an immediate plan to guarantee the safety of the two thousand people trapped on Nauru and Manus Island.

Afghanistan: sent back to a war zone

Afghanistan: sent back to a war zone (Petersmann 2017) Petersmann, Sandra. 2017. “Afghanistan: Sent back to a War Zone.” DW News, May 31. http://www.dw.com/en/afghanistan-sent-back-to-a-war-zone/a-39055955. Sandra Petersmann of DW News interviews Afghan deportees from Germany.  In the first two months of 2017, Germany denied more than half of all asylum applications.  Many of these deportees struggle in reintegrating into their countries of origin and continue to seek a route to return to Germany, where they have established strong ties.

Separated Families: Barriers to Family Reunification After Deportation

Separated Families: Barriers to Family Reunification After Deportation (Deborah A. Boehm, Journal on Migration and Human Security, 2017) This paper outlines the complexities — and unlikelihood — of keeping families together when facing, or in the aftermath of deportation. After discussing the context that limits or prevents reunification among immigrant families more generally, I outline several of the particular ways that families are divided when a member is deported. Drawing on case studies from longitudinal ethnographic research in Mexico and Read More

Trauma and Psychological Distress in Latino Citizen Children Following Parental Detention and Deportation

Trauma and Psychological Distress in Latino Citizen Children Following Parental Detention and Deportation (Lisseth Rojas-Flores, Mari L. Clements, J. Hwang Koo, and Judy London, Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, Vol 9(3), May 2017 The mental health impact of parental detention and deportation on citizen children is a topic of increasing concern. Forced parent– child separation and parental loss are potentially traumatic events (PTEs) with adverse effects on children’s mental health. Objective: This study examines posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and Read More

Report: Rate of deportations stagnating in Germany

Report: Rate of deportations stagnating in Germany (DW News, 2017) DW News. 2017. “Report: Rate of Deportations Stagnating in Germany,” June 4. http://www.dw.com/en/report-rate-of-deportations-stagnating-in-germany/a-39110422. Die Welt am Sonntag newspaper reported that, by the end of April, a total of 8,620 people had been sent back to their countries of origin after their asylum applications were rejected [in Germany]. The figures indicated a marked stagnation compared to last year, which saw a total of 25,375 deportations. This year has also seen fewer rejected Read More

Left Behind: The Dying Principle of Family Reunification Under Immigration Law

Left Behind: The Dying Principle of Family Reunification Under Immigration Law (Anita Ortiz Maddali, 50 U. Mich. J. L. Reform 107 (2016)) A key underpinning of modern U.S. immigration law is family reunification, but in practice it can privilege certain families and certain members within families. Drawing on legislative history, this Article examines the origins and objectives of the principle of family reunification in immigration law and relies on legal scholarship and sociological and anthropological research to reveal how contemporary immigration Read More

The EU-Turkey deal: what happens to people who return to Turkey?

The EU-Turkey deal: what happens to people who return to Turkey? (Sevda Tunaboylu and Jill Alpes, Forced Migration Review, 2017)   On 18th March 2016, Turkey and the European Union (EU) made a joint statement. Political leaders agreed to the return to Turkey of people who had crossed to the Greek islands through irregular channels and also agreed to prevent the arrival of new asylum seekers via sea or land – in exchange for the liberalisation of EU visa requirements Read More

God Brought You Home – Deportation as Moral Governance in the Lives of Nigerian Sex Worker Migrants

God Brought You Home – Deportation as Moral Governance in the Lives of Nigerian Sex Worker Migrants (Sine Plambech, Journal Of Ethnic And Migration Studies, 2017) Set in Nigeria among deported sex worker migrants and the institutions that seek to intervene in their migration, this article explores how deportation serves the dual function as a tool for migration governance as well as a tool for moral governance. Deportation has often been analysed from a Global North perspective and as a technology Read More

Mass Deportations Would Impoverish US Families and Create Immense Social Costs

Mass Deportations Would Impoverish US Families and Create Immense Social Costs (Robert Warren & Donald Kerwin, Center for Migration Studies, 2017) This paper provides a statistical portrait of the US undocumented population, with an emphasis on the social and economic condition of mixed-status households – that is, households that contain a US citizen and an undocumented resident. It is based primarily on data compiled by the Center for Migration Studies (CMS). Major findings include the following: There were 3.3 million mixed-status households Read More

Regulating the Human Supply Chain

Regulating the Human Supply Chain (Gordan 2017) Gordon, Jennifer. 2017. “Regulating the Human Supply Chain.” Iowa Law Review 102 (2): 445+. https://ilr.law.uiowa.edu/print/volume-102-issue-2/regulating-the-human-supply-chain/. Legal scholarship has failed to take note of the increasing impact of recruitment intermediaries on the rule of law in the United States, and on the regulation of employment in U.S. low-wage labor markets in particular.  This Article fills that gap for forming a novel conceptual framing of migrant recruitment as a “human supply chain.”  It builds on this Read More

Migration and Belonging: Narratives from a Highland Town

Migration and Belonging: Narratives from a Highland Town (collection of blog posts, introduction by Lauren Heidbrink, 2016) Youth Circulations is honored to showcase the important contributions of Guatemalan scholars in a new multilingual series entitled “Migration and Belonging: Narratives from a Highland Town.” This 7-part series emerges from a longitudinal study on the deportation and social reintegration of youth in Guatemala and Southern Mexico. With generous funding from the National Science Foundation, an interdisciplinary team conducted ethnographic and survey research Read More

Home Sweet Home? Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador’s Role in a Deepening Refugee Crisis

Home Sweet Home? Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador’s Role in a Deepening Refugee Crisis (2016, Amnesty International) As violence has worsened and poverty and inequality remain prevalent, the Central American governments of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador, also known as the Northern Triangle, are doubly failing to protect their citizens: socioeconomic conditions remain poor and an increasingly violent environment permeates every corner of their countries, which causes people to flee in record numbers, but governments are failing to provide protection Read More

Tackling the Global Refugee Crisis: From Shirking to Sharing Responsibility

Tackling the Global Refugee Crisis: From Shirking to Sharing Responsibility (Amnesty International, Oct. 2016) On 19 September 2016 the United Nations (UN) General Assembly collectively, and spectacularly, failed the 21 million refugees of this world. The “High-level Summit to address large movements of refugees and migrants” was to address the global refugee crisis, a crisis in which, daily, millions fleeing war and persecution in countries like Syria, South Sudan, Myanmar and Iraq suffer intolerable misery and human rights violations. World Read More

Documenting the Migration Crisis in the Mediterranean: Spaces of Transit, Migration Management and Migrant Agency

Documenting the Migration Crisis in the Mediterranean: Spaces of Transit, Migration Management and Migrant Agency (Leonie Ansems, Elspeth Guild and Sergio Carrera, CEPS Paper in Liberty and Security in Europe (2016)). This article sets out the main findings of the research project Documenting the Humanitarian Migration Crisis in the Mediterranean, which maps migration trajectories and transit points across Europe in order to develop a humanitarian response to the Mediterranean migration ‘crisis’. On their long journeys, people seeking refuge in Europe pass Read More

Safe and Voluntary Refugee Repatriation: From Principle to Practice

Safe and Voluntary Refugee Repatriation: From Principle to Practice (2016, Jeff Crisp & Katy Long) The article discusses the principles of voluntariness, safety, and dignity in the context of refugee repatriation. It begins by setting out the applicable legal framework, and discusses how that framework has been elaborated upon and refined since 1951. The article then discusses how the principles of voluntariness, safety, and dignity have, in practice, been applied (or, in a few unfortunate cases, ignored). After noting that Read More

Estadísticas Migratorias, Síntesis 2016

Estadísticas Migratorias, Síntesis 2016 (Secretaría de Gobernación – Estados Unidos de México) La creciente movilidad de personas a nivel mundial demanda la conformación de estadísticas sistematizadas, den cuenta de los distintos ujos de personas que arriban a México y parten de él por diversos motivos y en diferentes condiciones migratorias, así como de los que deciden establecerse en el país. Con base en los registros administrativos generados en los diversos puntos de internación, ocinas y estaciones migratorias de las delegaciones Read More

Plaintiff M68/2015 v. Minister for Immigration and Border Protection & Ors [2016] HCA 1

Plaintiff M68/2015 v. Minister for Immigration and Border Protection & Ors [2016] HCA 1 (2016) Plaintiff M68-2015 v Minister for Immigration and Border Protection. 2016. This case note provides an overview of the key facts and findings of the High Court in Plaintiff M68/2015 v. Minister for Immigration and Border Protection & Ors [2016] HCA 1, and sets out some of the key developments following the case. The plaintiff, an asylum seeker from Bangladesh, had been detained in Nauru at one of Australia’s Read More

‘[Take from Us Our] Wretched Refuse’: The Deportation of America’s Adoptees

‘[Take from Us Our] Wretched Refuse’: The Deportation of America’s Adoptees (DeLeith Duke Gossett, University of Cincinnati Law Review, Vol. 85, No. 1, 2017) Foreign-born children adopted by American citizens are subject to U.S. immigration law. Because the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees American citizenship only to “persons born or naturalized in the United States”, previous immigration law required that children born abroad and adopted by American parents undergo a separate naturalization process before the children received U.S. citizenship. Read More

Fast-Track to Injustice: Rapidly Deporting the Mentally Ill

Fast-Track to Injustice:  Rapidly Deporting the Mentally Ill (Aimee L. Mayer-Salins, 14 Cardozo Pub. L. Pol’y & Ethics J. 545, 2016) This Article contends that DHS should afford individuals with mental illness additional procedural protections in fast-track removal proceedings. The Article begins with an overview of these fast-track procedures, including a discussion of the limited procedural protections available. The Article highlights the lack of special procedural protections for individuals suffering from mental illnesses. The Article then contrasts this absence of special Read More

Migración en Tránsito por México: Rostro de una Crisis Humanitaria Internacional

Migración en Tránsito por México: Rostro de una Crisis Humanitaria Internacional (2016, Red de Documentación de Organizaciones Defensoras de Migrantes (REDODEM)) El fenómeno de la movilidad humana sigue siendo uno de los rasgos distintivos de las dinámicas globales. Si bien esto es parte de una dinámica prácticamente generalizada en el mundo, aquí nos referimos a aquellas migraciones que son fruto de la prevalencia de la desigualdad en diferentes regiones del planeta. Aquellas que por acción u omisión de los Estados Read More

Detained, Deceived, and Deported: Experiences of Recently Deported Central American Families

Detained, Deceived, and Deported: Experiences of Recently Deported Central American Families (Guillermo Cantor and Tory Johnson, American Immigration Council, 2016) Over the last few years, the escalation of violence in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala (collectively known as the Northern Triangle of Central America) has reached dramatic levels. thousands of women and their children have fled and arrived in the United states with the hope of finding protection. But for many of them, their attempts to escape merely resulted in Read More

Desert, detention, and deportation: Mexican women’s descriptions of migration stressors and sources of strength

Desert, detention, and deportation: Mexican women’s descriptions of migration stressors and sources of strength (Ruth Ann Belknap, Health Care for Women International, 37 (9), 2016) I analyzed interviews ( n = 10) of women recently deported from the United States of America to Mexico, exploring what women experienced immediately after deportation. The women who were residing in a short-term shelter in Nogales, Mexico, described their greatest stressors and sources of strength. Women identified the border crossing experience, apprehension, detention, and family Read More

Constructions of Deportability in Sweden: Refused Asylum Seekers’ Experiences in Relation to Gender, Family Life, and Reproduction

Constructions of Deportability in Sweden: Refused Asylum Seekers’ Experiences in Relation to Gender, Family Life, and Reproduction (Maja Sager, Nordic Journal of Women’s Studies, Vol. 24, 2016) Drawing on ethnographic material, this article examines how the experiences of refused asylum seekers in Sweden are shaped by migration policies, welfare policies, and gender norms. The article develops a feminist account of deportability to examine some gendered and reproductive aspects of everyday experiences of seeking asylum in Sweden. Focusing on the interview accounts Read More

“Where are we going to live?”: Migration and Statelessness in Haiti and the Dominican Republic

“Where are we going to live?”: Migration and Statelessness in Haiti and the Dominican Republic (Amnesty International 2016) Amnesty International. “‘Where Are We Going to Live?’: Migration and Statelessness in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.” 2016. https://www.amnestyusa.org/files/amr3641052016_where_am_i_going_to_live.compressed.pdf. In December 2013, the Dominican Republic set out an 18-month National Regularization Plan for Foreigners with Irregular Migration Status aimed at foreigners who had migrated to the Dominican Republic. In the same month, the government announced a suspension of all deportations, but promised Read More

Authorized and Unauthorized Immigrant Parents: The Impact of Legal Vulnerability on Family Contexts

Authorized and Unauthorized Immigrant Parents: The Impact of Legal Vulnerability on Family Contexts (Kalina Brabeck, Erin Sibley, & M. Brinton Lykes, Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Science, 2016). This study explores the social-ecological contexts of unauthorized immigrant families and their U.S.-born children, through examining how otherwise similarly low-income, urban, Latino immigrant families differ on the basis of the parents’ legal status and interactions with the immigration system. Drawing on social-ecological theory, variations based on parents’ legal vulnerability among exosystem-level experiences (e.g., Read More

Stopping the Revolving Door: Reception and Reintegration Services for Central American Deportees

Stopping the Revolving Door: Reception and Reintegration Services for Central American Deportees (Victoria Rietig & Rodrigo Dominguez Villegas, Migration Policy Institute, 2016) In the past five years, hundreds of thousands of Central American migrants deported from Mexico and the United States—including tens of thousands of children—have arrived back in the Northern Triangle countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. For many deportees, the conditions upon arrival are worse than those that compelled them to leave in the first place. They and their Read More

Missed Opportunities and Second Chances: Appellate Litigation Strategies for Asylum Seekers in Reinstatement Cases

Missed Opportunities and Second Chances: Appellate Litigation Strategies for Asylum Seekers in Reinstatement Cases (2015, Shuting Chen) This Article underscores the challenges faced by undocumented immigrants who, after removal, once again flee their countries of origin to seek safe haven in the United States. Many of them are apprehended again by immigration authorities, who may reinstate the prior removal order and severely limit the immigrants’ legal options. Although the government takes the position that such illegal reentrants are foreclosed from applying Read More

Removing Citizens: Parenthood, Immigration Courts, and Derivative Citizenship

Removing Citizens: Parenthood, Immigration Courts, and Derivative Citizenship (Kari Hong, Georgetown Immigration Law Journal (2015)). As a creature of administrative law, Congress has set forth clear, statutory definitions of “parent,” “child,” “son,” “daughter,” and “step-parent.” As a practical matter, these terms create a uniform system by which family relationships are recognized and immigration benefits are conferred. In one notable exception, Congress directs adjudicators to look to state law when determining which children are citizens at birth. Derivative citizenship, the legal process Read More

Assessment of the Risk of Refoulement Under Article 3 ECHR in Cases of Persons Returning to Somalia

Assessment of the Risk of Refoulement Under Article 3 ECHR in Cases of Persons Returning to Somalia (Daan Bes, et al. 2014) In 2013 the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) communicated to the Dutch Government several complaints against the Netherlands of Somali applicants who claim that their expulsion to their country of origin would violate Article 3 of the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR). In the context of these complaints the ECtHR referred questions to the Dutch Government on: Read More

Preventing irregular migration: restrictions on movement, mental injury and breach of fundamental rights

Preventing irregular migration: restrictions on movement, mental injury and breach of fundamental rights (Zia Akhtar, International Journal of Public Law and Policy, Vol. 4, No. 2, 2014) The legal regime has become increasingly strict for those facing deportation as ‘illegal’ migrants in both the UK and the USA. The UK Borders, Citizenship and Immigration Act 2009 has created an overlap between criminal and the seeker of asylum or refugee. It has led to the overstayers’ confinement without safeguards for their age Read More

Lack of Detained Parents’ Access to the Family Justice System and the Unjust Severance of the Parent-Child Relationship

Lack of Detained Parents’ Access to the Family Justice System and the Unjust Severance of the Parent-Child Relationship (2013, Sarah Rogerson) Immigration law enforcement has numerous intended and unintended consequences for immigrant families. When a parent is detained as a result of immigration enforcement activities, their ability to access to the family justice system is limited and there are few, if any, due process protections afforded to them. As a result, it is now well-documented that children of detained parents have Read More

Parental Deportation, Families, and Mental Health

Parental Deportation, Families, and Mental Health (Schuyler W. Henderson, M.D., M.P.H. & Charles D.R. Baily, M.S., Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 52, Issue 5, May 2013) There are an estimated 5.5 million children in the United States whose parents are unauthorized immigrants, and approximately three fourths of these children are American citizens. For these children, parental deportation is a real threat. From 1998 through 2007, more than 100,000 parents of U.S. citizen children were deported. Since then, immigration Read More

Exploring Parent-Child Communication in the Context of Threat: Mixed-status families facing detention and deportation in post 9/11 USA.

Exploring Parent-Child Communication in the Context of Threat:  Mixed-status families facing detention and deportation in post 9/11 USA.  (M. Brinton Lykes, Kalina M. Brabeck & Cristina Hunter. Community, Work and Family, 16(2), 123-146 (2013)). This paper explores whether and how documented and undocumented migrant parents communicate with their children about the threats posed by the intensified enforcement of 1996 and 2001 US immigration reforms; whether parents facing potential detention and deportation plan for the care of their children; and whether their Read More

Unintended and Unavoidable: The Failure to Protect Rule and Its Consequences for Undocumented Parents and their Children

Unintended and Unavoidable: The Failure to Protect Rule and Its Consequences for Undocumented Parents and their Children (Sarah Hill Rogerson, 2012) Parents without immigration status in the United States regularly face the threat of deportation and separation from their children. When an undocumented parent is brought to the attention of law enforcement through the child welfare system, they also face the potential of the loss of legal custodial rights to their children. The child welfare system and immigration enforcement mechanisms Read More

The Family Rights of European Children: Expulsion of Non-European Parents

The Family Rights of European Children: Expulsion of Non-European Parents (Gareth T. Davies, 2012) In Ruiz Zambrano and Dereci the European Court of Justice found that EU law prohibits expulsion of a family member of a Union citizen if that expulsion would force the Union citizen to leave the Union too. This is of particular importance where the Union citizen is a child, since children are particularly dependent upon their parents and perhaps cannot be expected to remain behind without Read More

Separation, Deportation, Termination

Separation, Deportation, Termination (Marcia Yablon-Zug, 32 B.C. J.L. & Soc. Just. 63 (2012)). There is a growing practice of separating immigrant children from their deportable parents. Parental fitness is no longer the standard with regard to undocumented immigrant parents. Increasingly, fit undocumented parents must convince courts and welfare agencies that continuing or resuming parental custody is in their child’s best interest. This requirement is unique to immigrant parents and can have a disastrous impact on their ability to retain custody of Read More

Disabled and Disserved: The Right to Counsel for Mentally Disabled Aliens in Removal Proceedings

Disabled and Disserved: The Right to Counsel for Mentally Disabled Aliens in Removal Proceedings (Aliza B. Kaplan, 26 Geo. Immigr. L.J. 523, 2012) In May 2011, in Matter of M-A-M, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) for the first time examined the issue of mentally disabled aliens and their vulnerability in immigration proceedings. To assist Immigration Judges (IJs), the BIA created a framework to analyze cases where issues of mental competency are raised. While this decision appears to recognize the unjust Read More

Disappearing Parents: Immigration Enforcement and the Child Welfare System

Disappearing Parents: Immigration Enforcement and the Child Welfare System (Nina Rabin, 2011) This Article presents original empirical research that documents systemic failures of the federal immigration enforcement and state child welfare systems when immigrant parents in detention and deportation proceedings have children in state custody. The intertwined but uncoordinated workings of the federal and state systems result in severe family disruptions and raise concerns regarding parental rights of constitutional magnitude. This Article documents this phenomenon in two ways. First, it Read More

Torturous Intent: Refoulement of Haitian Nationals and U.S. Obligations under the Convention Against Torture

Torturous Intent: Refoulement of Haitian Nationals and U.S. Obligations under the Convention Against Torture (Alyssa Bell & Julie Dona, 35 N.Y.U. Rev. L. & Soc. Change 707 (2011)) This paper argues that the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) erred when it strictly limited the scope of Convention Against Torture (CAT) protection for deportees facing inhumane treatment in Haitian jails. The authors examine In re J-E-, in which the BIA narrowed the definition of torture under CAT to acts undertaken by Read More

Sent “Home” With Nothing: The Deportation of Jamaicans with Mental Disabilities

Sent “Home” With Nothing: The Deportation of Jamaicans with Mental Disabilities (Georgetown Law Human Rights Institute, 2011) Deportation from the United States involves much more than a plane ride “home.” Particularly for deported persons with mental disabilities, it can mean a harrowing journey to a country one does not remember, a culture that stigmatizes deported persons and persons with mental disabilities, and a society filled with obstacles to accessing adequate medical care, housing, and employment. This report—based on interviews with Read More

The Effects of U.S. Deportation Policies on Immigrant Families and Communities: Cross-Border Perspectives

The Effects of U.S. Deportation Policies on Immigrant Families and Communities: Cross-Border Perspectives (2010, Jacqueline Hagan, Brianna Castro, and Nestor Rodriguez) Since the mid-1990s, the United States has enacted a series of laws that makes it easier to arrest, detain, and deport noncitizens. These laws, which have been highly criticized for the devastation they have brought to immigrant families, represent an abrupt departure from post–World War II immigration policies, which provided increasing rights to immigrants and their families. In this Read More

Returned to Risk: Deportation of HIV-Positive Migrants

Returned to Risk: Deportation of HIV-Positive Migrants (Human Rights Watch, 2009) Adrea Mortlock was 15 in 1979 when she arrived in New York from Jamaica, leaving behind the abusive household where she had lived since her mother, years earlier, had left for work in the United States. In 1987, she was convicted of selling cocaine and served a year in prison. A legal permanent resident of the United States with a US-citizen daughter and son, Ms. Mortlock was ordered deported Read More

Exploitation Nation: The Thin and Grey Legal Lines between Trafficked Persons and Abused Migrant Laborers

Exploitation Nation: The Thin and Grey Legal Lines between Trafficked Persons and Abused Migrant Laborers (Dina Francesca Haynes, 23 Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics & Public Policy 1 (2009)). People around the world are on the move, pushed by external events such as civil war, political upheaval, and increasingly environmental disasters and pulled by the lure of a better life, a better job, a better way to provide for their families. The United States has created an inconsistent legal framework for Read More

Creating Crisis: Immigration Raids and the Destabilization of Immigrant Families

Creating Crisis: Immigration Raids and the Destabilization of Immigrant Families (David B. Thronson, 43 Wake Forest L. Rev. 391 (2008)) Given the deep integration of immigrants into the fabric of the United States through families, the increasing use of raids in homes and workplaces as an immigration law enforcement strategy has profound and predictable impacts on children. While immigration raids formally are targeted at adults, they have ripple effects for children as an unmistakable message of loss and fear is communicated Read More

American Diaspora: The Deportation of Lawful Permanent Residents from the United States and the Destruction of their Families

American Diaspora: The Deportation of Lawful Permanent Residents from the United States and the Destruction of their Families (Bryan Lonegan, 32 N.Y.U. Rev. L. & Soc. Change 55 (2007)) This article discusses deportation of lawful permanent residents and the effects these deportations have on families. The focus of this article is on lawful permanent residents faced with deportation because of criminal convictions, and the effect of deportation on their families. It emphasizes the utter lack of rationality, compassion, and flexibility in Read More

Detention and Deportation: A Continuing Scandal

Detention and Deportation: A Continuing Scandal (Glenn 2007) Nicholls, Glenn. 2007. “Detention and Deportation: A Continuing Scandal.” Arena. http://arena.org.au/detention-and-deportation-a-continuing-scandal/. Glenn Nicholls argues for fundamental reforms in the treatment of detainees and deportation legislation [in Australia]. The Cornelia Rau and Vivian Alvarez scandals in 2005 brought intense pressure on the Immigration Department to be more careful in carrying out deportations and incarcerating potential deportees. The department is spending $550 million over five years on upgrading its computer systems and has promised Read More